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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Category — Food and Recipes

What The Heck Is Muffuletta?

Serve up this New Orleans favorite at your next get-together and you’ll be a “hero!”

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9 Comments

Cherries For Health!

February is National Cherry Month, but you can reap the benefits of this delicious superfood year-round!

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5 Comments

Yummy Chocolate Fondue!

Celebrate any special occasion with this chocolate-lovers dream!

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What The Heck is Poutine?

February 1 – 7 is La Poutine Week, and we’ve got the gravy on this Canadian comfort food, recipes included!

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18 Comments

Warming Winter Smoothies!

These recipes will boost your immunity and take away winter’s chill.

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2 Comments

Don’t Forget The Horseradish!

Read why this potent condiment is a superfood superstar!

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9 Comments

What The Heck Is Haggis?

Haggis, the national dish of Scotland, is a type of sausage, and a by-product of the need to be as efficient as possible when butchering meat. Read the history of this unusual dish – recipe included!

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6 Comments

Game Day Snacks!

Satisfy hungry football fanatics on game day with these 3 favorites from the kitchen of Farmers’ Almanac,

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.