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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Warm Winter Memories

Warm Winter Memories

Spring may be just around the corner, but this winter won’t be going away quietly. While we see the season out the door, here’s a look at some of your warmest winter memories:

“When I was young we sledded down the street around the corner. So much fun! There is no way that could be done now, too much traffic!”
– Kathy

“After a big snow storm we would go to the local grocery store parking lot after they plowed it and climb the mount of snow to be King of the mountain. That was so much fun and free.”
– Becky

“Going downhill skiing with all my kids and grandkids often during the winter, so much fun!”
– Twylla

“Growing up in Pennsylvania we would take my Dad’s drive-up blocks and ice them over and use them as a ramp for our sleds. What fun!”
– Rebecca

“Snowball fights and building snow forts then going inside to a warm bowl of soup and Hot chocolate. The old wood stove putting off its warmth.The smell of fresh baked cookies my mother would be making. I miss those days.”
– Cynthia

“Spending some quality time with my son in the U.P. walking in the woods and checking out the Tahquamenon Falls with all the ice and snow.”
– Ron

“Jumping into drifts from the roof of the house after wind driven snow storms.”
– Ken

“Sitting in a hot tub on a mountain in TN with my wife sipping wine and watching the snow fall from the sky.”
– Dennis

“My favorite winter memory is having a snowball fight with my hubby and then heading inside the house to snuggle in front of the fireplace, while drinking hot cocoa. It was a great day!”
– Holly

“When we were young. We built a snowman and the local newspaper put our picture with the snowman on the front page.”
– Linda

“Long walks in the snow and the quietness of winter. Beautiful!”
– Carla

“I always loved going downtown Detroit for ice skating outside with my friends!”
– Dino

“The snow falling softly in the moonlight. The frozen snow screaming and crackling under every one of my steps. Clouds of winter breaths, nose tingling and numbing in the crystalline air. Church at midnight. The soft glow of candlelight, the drifting sounds of organ music, human warmth reaching deep in my soul. The smells of mom’s kitchen, the cheering sounds of gift-wrap paper releasing awaited treasures but going skating on Christmas morning and coming home to hot chocolate and croissant: memories that cannot be bought of the magic of winter.”
– Diane

“Snowmobiling with my younger brother in the field near our home! It took us a couple years to ruin that machine and we had a blast doing it! Building snow forts was also a wonderful activity. We have snow here six months a year, normally. Fun, Fun, Fun!”
– Laura

“Fond memories of winter and snowfall growing up in Kentucky. When school was cancelled due to heavy snow, my brothers and I took full advantage of the free day. We would dress warmly, head outside to make a snowman. After our snowman was made, we would throw a few snowballs at each other and make snow angels. We went inside to warm up and drink hot chocolate, then head back outside to go sledding on garbage lids. Blessed with a steep hill, we barreled down the slope again and again. The happy time we spent having fun relieved our cabin fever symptoms and made for a very enjoyable day with no arguing & much camaraderie.”
– Lelya

“I remember as a kid about 8 years old, my older brother built a snow cave it was huge, and had little cubby holes to put snacks in, we would put our milk duds in the cubby holes and they would freeze and then we would just lay back in our snow cave and eat frozen Milk Duds. I had the best big brother in the world!”
– Laurie

“Skating on Shenipsit Lake in Tolland, Connecticut. Skating way, way out in the middle of the lake, for what seemed like miles. Bubbles frozen in the ice. Skate blades skittering over the bumpy parts. Falling down on purpose and lying on the ice staring at the sky. A campfire on the bank and a thermos of hot chocolate and not minding that my feet and fingers were numb with cold.”
– Laura

“Winter time when I was a kid , forced us to stay inside and play board games or cards. Sometimes we made popcorn, fudge and hot coco. These were fun times.”
– Judy

“The first time I saw snow I was 20. Me and my husband made a snowman and played like children for hours in it.”
– Kim

“Our family enjoyed making snow cream. We made the best it was so good with lots of vanilla!”
– Debbie

“Bundling up in clothes til I couldn’t move, wrapping up in extra blankets, more time with family, the peace that settles in with winter.”
– Cynthia

2 comments

1 Mary Jo { 03.12.14 at 12:35 pm }

I remember ice skating with my whole family. I was little and had 4 blades on my skates. But I remember the burn barrel fires, toasted marshmellows, hot chocolate, colored lights, and all of us singing together with everyone else that was there. Also, they would close off 1 of the streets that had 2 hills for sleigh riding. That was all day fun!

2 edna { 03.12.14 at 10:57 am }

I remember living in upstate ny and having to walk a mile down our back road to get to the school bus because our road wasn’t plowed. Snow up to our knees .Walking back up the hill at night and then sledding til dark .Then dinner, homework and bed by nine. Good memories!!

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