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Will New Year’s Eve Be Frigid or Fair?

Will New Year’s Eve Be Frigid or Fair?

Unbelievably, another year has almost passed us by.

New Year’s Eve is one of the most exciting nights of the year, but if you’re planning on traveling or celebrating outdoors, be sure to check out our long-range predictions first.

Find out now whether you should pile on the layers or if you’ll be shoveling your driveway before heading out for the big night! Here’s a look at what we’re predicting for your region:

Northeast U.S.
New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Washington D.C.
Cold on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, a coastal system brings snow, rain for New England, extending into Mid-Atlantic region. Rain/sleet/snow for Mummers marching in Philly.

Midwest/Great Lakes U.S.
Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois, Wisconsin
Increasing clouds on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, scattered snow showers, flurries.

Southeast U.S.
Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida
Fair and cold with frosts to Florida on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, rain, showers.

North Central U.S.
Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana
Unsettled weather on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, showers and much colder for the Great Plains.

South Central U.S.
Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico
Unsettled weather on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, showers and much colder.

Northwest U.S.
Washington, Oregon, Idaho
Unsettled, with showers, especially along the coast on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, cloudy with a few showers.

Southwest U.S.
California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona
Unsettled, with showers for the Pacific Coast to close out the year. Then, on New Year’s Day, variable cloudiness with a few passing showers. Mixed clouds and sun for the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena.

Newfoundland, Labrador
As 2013 comes to a close, what else? One final snowstorm on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, blustery, cold.

Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec
Fair and cold weather to close out the year. Then, on New Year’s Day, an offshore storm delivers some snow and flurry activity; some rain, ice mixes in over Nova Scotia, P.E.I.

Ontario
Fair skies, followed by increasing clouds as the year comes to an end. Then, on New Year’s Day, scattered snow showers, flurries.

Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
Unsettled with snow from the Rockies on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, showers.

British Columbia
Unsettled with some showers, especially through the coastal areas on New Year’s Eve. Then, on New Year’s Day, cloudy with a few showers.

2 comments

1 Antoinette Vawter { 12.20.13 at 10:07 am }

I rely on Farmer’s Almanac forecasts and they have not let me down. Weather here is already shaping toward the prediction for our after Christmas weather. Long range forecasts are rare on the web. Why would they be more reliable than our Almanac?

2 clark cook { 12.18.13 at 9:36 am }

New Year’s Eve report for “British Columbia”. C’mon now boys ‘n girls–you can do better than THIS! Your projection for NY Eve pertains only to a tiny SW portion of a Province that’s bigger than Texas! In central BC we’ve had -40 below zero C. on New Year’s Eve. Can you expand your prediction a bit NORTH? w////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////zzzzzz

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