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The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Now That’s Hot! Record-Breaking Highs

Now That’s Hot! Record-Breaking Highs

After a couple of very hot, dry seasons, and some heat waves predicted for the remainder of this year, some of you have been pleading for relief from the heat of summer.

As hot as some of those temperatures have been, though, they’ve got nothing on the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth: 134° F at Furnace Creek Ranch, in Death Valley, California, on July 10, 1913.

The next hottest temperature — 128° F — has been recorded in Kuwait, Pakistan, and the U.S. state of Arizona.

Canada’s hottest temperature was more than 20 degrees colder than the Earth’s hottest: 113° F (45° C) recorded at Midale, Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan on July 5, 1937.

Want to know what the record high temperature is for your state? Find out below!

State Temp. Date Station
Alabama 112° F September 5, 1925 Centerville
Alaska 100° F June 27, 1915 Fort Yukon
Arizona 128° F June 29, 1994 Lake Havasu City
Arkansas 120° F August 10, 1936 Ozark
California 134° F July 10, 1913 Death Valley
Colorado 114° F June 26, 2012 Las Animas
Connecticut 106° F July 15, 1995 Danbury
Delaware 110° F July 21, 1930 Millsboro
Florida 109° F June 29, 1931 Monticello
Georgia 112° F August 20, 1983 Greenville
Hawaii 98° F July 14, 1957 PuÊ»unene
Idaho 118° F July 28, 1934 Orofino
Illinois 117° F July 14, 1954 East Saint Louis
Indiana 116° F July 14, 1936 Collegeville
Iowa 118° F July 20, 1934 Keokuk
Kansas 121° F July 24, 1936 Alton
Kentucky 114° F July 28, 1930 Greensburg
Louisiana 114° F August 10, 1936 Plain Dealing
Maine 105° F July 10, 1911 North Bridgton
Maryland 109° F July 10, 1936 Cumberland, Frederick
Massachusetts 107° F August 2, 1975 New Bedford, Chester
Michigan 112° F July 13, 1936 Mio
Minnesota 115° F July 29, 1917 Beardsley
Mississippi 115° F July 29, 1930 Holly Springs
Missouri 118° F July 14, 1954 Warsaw, Union
Montana 117° F July 5, 1937 Medicine Lake
Nebraska 118° F July 24, 1936 Minden
Nevada 125° F June 29, 1994 Laughlin
New Hampshire 106° F July 4, 1911 Nashua
New Jersey 110° F July 10, 1936 Runyon
New Mexico 122° F June 27, 1994 Lakewood
New York 108° F July 8, 2010 Mineola
North Carolina 110° F August 21, 1983 Fayetteville
North Dakota 121° F July 6, 1936 Steele
Ohio 113° F July 21, 1934 Gallipolis
Oklahoma 120° F June 27, 1994 Tipton
Oregon 117° F August 4, 1998 Pelton Dam
Pennsylvania 111° F July 10, 1936 Phoenixville
Rhode Island 104° F August 2, 1975 Providence
South Carolina 113° F June 30, 2012 Johnston
South Dakota 120° F July 15, 2006 Usta
Tennessee 113° F August 9, 1930 Perryville
Texas 120° F June 28, 1994 Monahans
Utah 117° F July 5, 1985 Saint George
Vermont 105° F July 4, 1911 Vernon
Virginia 110° F July 15, 1954 Balcony Falls
Washington 118° F August 5, 1961 Ice Harbor Dam
West Virginia 112° F July 10, 1936 Martinsburg
Wisconsin 114° F July 13, 1936 Wisconsin Dells
Wyoming 114° F July 12, 1900 Basin

Information Courtesy the National Climatic Data Center.

5 comments

1 Rebecca { 07.18.13 at 1:22 pm }

I was wondering the same thing as Jack was.
why do the weather people have to conceal their true identities?

2 GeneG { 07.18.13 at 1:10 pm }

Imagine — the only state that has never had a 100 degree day is Hawaii!

3 Mary Montgomery { 07.17.13 at 7:58 pm }

I thought I remembered reading that there was a 136 degree reading in Libya.

4 Herb { 07.17.13 at 5:46 pm }

Looks like 1936 was a toasty year, I wonder if thermometers were accurate back then.

5 Jack { 07.17.13 at 10:43 am }

Why do your weather people have to conceal their true Identities

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