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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

How Much Snow Can Fall in One Day?

How Much Snow Can Fall in One Day?

December isn’t usually the snowiest month of the year for most regions, but the past week has brought a lot of snow to many areas of the country, setting records for the month in some parts of the Midwest. Those “records” have amounted to less than a foot of snow in most areas, though. They still don’t touch the three records for the most snowfall in a single day:

The all-time world record for the largest snowfall in a single day was set in the United States on December 4, 1913, when Georgetown, Colorado received a staggering 63” of snow — more than five feet! No snowstorm in nearly 100 years has dumped more snow in one day, though two other U.S. storms have come close.

On December 29, 1955, 62” of snow fell on Thompson Pass, Alaska, coming a single inch shy of tying the 1913 record.

The third largest single-day snowfall occurred January 19, 1933, smack in the middle of the other two records, when 60” fell on Giant Forest, California.

The record for the largest single-day snowfall in Canada goes to Tahtsa Lake West, British Columbia, where 57” fell on February 11, 1999.

Though these records may seem unbelievable, they still pale in comparison to the record for the largest snowfall during a single storm. Read about that record-setting storm here.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.