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The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Numbingly Cold Conditions Won’t End For Spring!

Numbingly Cold Conditions Won’t End For Spring!

According to the calendar, spring officially arrives at 7:44 a.m. (EDT) March 20, 2009; but sources at the Farmers’ Almanac predict that the cold weather will not depart as easily as many hope.

The 2009 Farmers’ Almanac issued a “Numbingly Cold” winter forecast for most regions of the country. The accuracy of that prediction was borne out by the heavier-than-normal snow that pounded New England and many of the northern Great Lakes and Plains States, as well as the freezing conditions that invaded the typically temperate southern states and the unusual snowfall in areas such as Las Vegas, Nevada, and Atlanta, Georgia.

“Anticipation of warmer weather is high,” shares Peter Geiger, Philom., Editor. “People want to shut off their heat, start their gardening, and shed their winter wardrobes. Unfortunately, the Farmers’ Almanac is predicting a very slow start to the spring season.”

According to the 2009 Farmers’ Almanac harsh winter weather will persist well into the coming months, with unseasonably cold temperatures gripping most regions through the end of April. A major storm system is also expected to batter the Eastern half of the continent with cold and precipitation in mid-May. The southern U.S. should see dry and hot conditions during early May, making way for cooler, wetter weather toward the end of the month. Wet, cool conditions are expected to persist in the northern U.S. through much of June, with southern states seeing more typical hot, dry weather into the start of summer.

“Fortunately, if you can make it through the cool, unsettled spring season,” Geiger states, “summer looks like it’s going to be warm and moist in many areas.”

What about Canada? See our spring forecast for Canada.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.