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The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Chilling Forecast for Halloween

Chilling Forecast for Halloween

No matter where you live, chances are you won’t need ghouls and goblins this Halloween to send chills up your spine. Farmers’ Almanac forecaster Caleb Weatherbee is predicting that most areas of the United States and Canada will see unseasonably cold weather this week.

While Ontario and the Midwestern states should be cold and dry, trick-or-treaters in other areas may want to scare up an umbrella; monstrously wet, unsettled conditions could be in store. Meanwhile, the U.S. and Canadian Rockies are expected to get into the Halloween spirit by donning a sheet of ghostly white snow. Here’s a closer look at what’s brewing for your area:

U.S.

Northeast
BOO! A cold spell arrives in time for Halloween.

Great Lakes/Midwest
Cold and dry just in time for trick-or-treaters.

Southeast
An unseasonably chilly spell of weather coincides with Halloween.

North Central
Fair, then stormy, with snow in the Rockies and the Plains States.

South Central
Fair, then light snow Southern Rockies into Texas.

Northwest
More like a trick, rather than a treat, for Halloween: fair, then stormy for Washington and Oregon.

Southwest
Fair, then turning unsettled.

Canada

Newfoundland, Labrador
Fair initially, then showers spread in from west.

Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec
BOO! A cold spell arrives in time for Halloween.

Ontario
Cold and dry just in time for trick-or-treaters.

Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan
More of a weather trick as opposed to a treat: fair, then stormy weather with snow in the Rockies and the Prairies.

British Columbia
More like a trick, rather than a treat, for Halloween: fair, then stormy.

Happy haunting.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.