Farmers Almanac Weather

Current Moon Phase

Waning Crescent
13% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

What is Snow?

What is Snow?

How snow is formed?

  • Snow is formed from water vapors in the cold clouds that have condensed into ice crystals.
  • Ice crystals fasten onto a dust speck. One crystal attaches to another forming a snowflake. Once the snowflake is heavy enough, it falls from the cloud.
  • A snowflake is either a single ice crystal or many crystals.
  • The size of a snowflake is determined by how many ice crystals join together.
  • The tops of clouds must be below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, or 0 degrees Celsius in order for snowfall to occur.
  • Snow can fall from any layered cloud that is cold enough.

Snow’s effect on the ground:

· Snow accumulated on the ground helps keep bulbs and plant roots (beneath the ground) from freezing in frigid weather.

  • As soft snowflakes pile on top of one another, pockets of air are left between them. This air helps protect seeds, bulbs and roots from freezing beneath the soil in winter.
  • In spring when the snow begins to melt, some snow soaks into the earth to water the soil, while other melted snow replenishes streams, lakes and rivers.

Snow trivia:

  • The snow capital of the United States is Stampede Pass, Washington. Each year it has an average snowfall of 430″.
  • The largest snowflake recorded fell in 1887 in Montana. It was 15” in diameter.
  • Every snowflake has six sides or points, yet no two snowflakes are ever the same in design.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.