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Farmers' Almanac

Summer Weather Outlook
&
Planting Guide

SummerStormy,
Sizzler Ahead!

Will the Year Without A Summer Repeat 200 Years Later?! Farmers’ Almanac Weighs In.

(to zoom in on a region, click the zone)

U.S. Zone 1

Includes New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Washington D.C.

U.S. Zone 2

Includes Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois, Wisconsin

U.S. Zone 3

Includes Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida

U.S. Zone 4

Includes Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana

U.S. Zone 5

Includes Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico

U.S. Zone 6

Includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho

U.S. Zone 7

Includes California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona

While this spring has been anything but warm and mild, the Farmers’ Almanac is happy to report that the summer of 2016 will not be a repeat of what many refer to as “Eighteen hundred froze to death.”

So what's in store?

Summer officially arrives on Monday, June 20th at 6:34 p.m. EDT with the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year in terms of daylight. And according to the Farmers’ Almanac, hot and wet conditions are on tap.

Don't be surprised if the song “Stormy Weather” gets stuck in your head as we greet the summer season. According to the long-range weather outlook from the pages of the Farmers’ Almanac, there will be a greater-than-normal coverage of thunderstorms, which unfortunately will be strong, particularly over the eastern third of the nation. During June and July over "tornado alley" in the middle part of the country, some widespread tornadic activity is possible.

Portions of the Southern Rockies and Southern Plains could also experience higher-than-normal thunderstorm activity.

How HOT?

Unlike the conditions 200 years ago (which featured a very, historically cold summer), above-normal temperatures are on tap for most areas of the country, but especially in the Southern and Eastern regions of the United States.

But interestingly, while typically the hottest weather can be expected in late July or early August (the dreaded “Dog Days”), this year’s summer heat could peak in late August into early September.

The Pacific Northwest and Northern Plains should see near-normal summertime temperatures and precipitation. The Southwest will get typical summertime weather: hot and dry.

Tropical storms?

As for tropical activity, we are forecasting tropical storm threats for early July, late August, and late September along the Gulf Coast and hurricane threats in early August along the Gulf Coast and mid-August along the Atlantic Coast. Take note that the traditional peak of the hurricane season is September 10.

Are you ready?

Canada Zone 1

Newfoundland, Labrador

Canada Zone 2

Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec Long

Canada Zone 3

Ontario

Canada Zone 4

Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan

Canada Zone 5

British Columbia

Northern Canada

Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut

While this spring has been anything but warm and mild, the Farmers’ Almanac is happy to report that the summer of 2016 will not be a repeat of what many refer to as “Eighteen hundred froze to death.”

So what is in store?

Summer 2016 officially arrives on Monday, June 20th at 6:34 p.m. EDT with the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year in terms of daylight. With the new season we are predicting a greater-than-normal risk of showery rains, particularly over the eastern half of the nation. There might also be some particularly severe weather, which might even lead to tornado activity for the Prairies.

What about the heat?

Plan on tuning up those A/C units and bring the fans down from the attic because you’re going to need them as we are calling for an above-normal summer, temperature-wise, for the eastern half of the country.

Interestingly, while typically the hottest weather can be expected in late July or early August (the dreaded “Dog Days”), this year’s summer heat could peak in late August into early September.

Meanwhile, near-normal summertime temperatures and precipitation are forecast for British Columbia and the Prairies, while cooler-than-normal temperatures are anticipated for the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut.

Tropical Storms?

As for tropical activity we are forecasting hurricane threats for Nova Scotia during the early part of September and again in mid-to-late September, while an unusually late tropical storm might track close to Newfoundland toward the end of October.

Some will recall that we had noted a tropical storm threat for Newfoundland around October 20th, 2014, and just one day earlier Hurricane Gonzalo took a swipe at Cape Race, proving that a tropical cyclone is still quite possible over northern waters even deep into the fall season. Finally, take note that the traditional peak of the hurricane season is September 10. Are you ready?

VacationRoad
Trip!
Top10Vegetables
To Grow
by Amber Kanuckel
(click each vegetable for details)

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Start: Start seeds 6-8 weeks before the last frost

Transplant: Plant outdoors when night time lows reach 60°F or higher

Water: Regularly—soil must be evenly moist, but not soggy

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Start: Seeds best started directly in the garden after soil temperatures reach 60° to 65°F

Water: Regularly, particularly after flowers appear

Sweet Bell Peppers

Sweet Bell Peppers

Start: Start seeds 8-10 weeks before the last frost

Transplant: When soil temperatures reach at least 60° to 70°F

Water: Regularly–keep soil moist but not flooded

Beans

Beans

Start: Never start indoors, sow outdoors when average temperatures reach 60° to 70°F

Water: Once per week, or each time the soil starts to dry out

Carrots

Carrots

Start: Start seeds outdoors, after frost, when soil temperatures reach 55°F

Water: Daily, very lightly until seeds sprout, then cut back to once weekly, or as the soil dries

Summer Squash

Summer Squash

Start: Start seeds 3-4 weeks before the last frost

Transplant: When soil temperatures reach 60°F

Water: Weekly, or whenever soil starts to dry out

Onions

Onions

Start: 3 ways to start: (1) Start seeds in midsummer, harvest sets in the fall (2) Start seeds indoors 8-10 weeks before the last frost (3) Start last year’s sets outdoors 2-4 weeks before the last frost date

Transplant: (Seeds or sets) 2-4 weeks before the last frost

Water: Once to twice per week to keep soil moist–stop one week before harvesting

Lettuce

Lettuce

Start: Start seeds outdoors as soon as the soil can be worked, or indoors 3-4 weeks before you transplant them

Transplant: Transplant any time once plants have been hardened off

Water: Once per week during spring–switch to more frequent, light watering over the summer

Peas

Peas

Start: Sow seed outdoors as soon as the soil can be worked

Water: Only when the soil is dry–about once per week in the spring, more often in the summer

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Start: Start outdoors after last frost

Water: Frequently–at least twice per week, more during hot, dry weather

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