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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Predicted Snowstorm Spares Super Bowl, Rushes in for Post-Game

FARMERS’ ALMANAC
PRESS RELEASE
DATE: February 3, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Sandi Duncan, Philom., Managing Editor -207-755-2349 – sduncan@farmersalmanac.com

Lewiston, ME: A snowstorm that had been predicted more than two years ago using a 197-year-old formula came as predicted, missing Super Bowl players and fans by mere hours.

The 2014 edition of the Farmers’ Almanac contained the following forecast for February 1-3: “An intense storm, heavy rain, snow and strong winds. This could seriously impact Super Bowl XLVIII on Feb. 2 …”

It was a bold statement to make, and one that grabbed much attention in the media. Then again, the NFL’s decision to hold the biggest annual sporting event in the world at a cold weather site was equally bold.

What the Farmers’ Almanac didn’t foresee, with Lady Liberty only a few miles away, was Mother Nature running her own version of a “weather Statue of Liberty” play at the Almanac’s forecast for the biggest sporting event of the year — Super Bowl Sunday.

Fortunately for fans and the Seahawks and Broncos, Mother Nature was on their side and weather conditions proved not to be as miserable as predicted, at least during game time. Snow did begin to fall just a few hours after players and fans left MetLife Stadium, well within the timeframe predicted by the Farmers’ Almanac.

The Almanac’s long-range weather prognosticator, Caleb Weatherbee says, “This was one of our more challenging forecasts. Our long-range outlooks are broken into 3-day increments. But in recent weeks we were besieged by members of the news media regarding our storm forecast for Feb. 1-3 and the implications it might have on the Super Bowl. Suddenly, everyone was focused not on a time interval of a few days, but just a few hours! The bottom line is that had the snow on Monday morning arrived about 12 hours earlier, it would have impacted the big game. A variety of advisories and warnings for snow were in place by game time. Considering this forecast was originally made two years ago, I think we did a very good job!”

An even more intense storm is expected to pound the region later this week, which was also predicted in the 2014 Farmers’ Almanac. Weatherbee red-flagged the first 10 days of February for intense snow in New England and the Mid-Atlantic states, and that prediction appears to be on pace to come true by midweek.

The Farmers’ Almanac has been predicting the weather since 1818. It bases its long-range weather forecasts on a mathematical and astronomical formula that takes things like sunspot activity, tidal action of the moon, the position of the planets and a variety of other factors into consideration. It is one of the only sources brave enough to publish a long-range outlook for up to a year in advance. Is it always 100 percent accurate? Of course not, but what source of weather forecasting is? Independent readers have determined that the Almanac is 80 percent accurate, on average.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.