Current Moon Phase

Waxing Crescent
46% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Canadian Farmers’ Almanac Uses Four-Letter Word to Describe Winter …

Lewiston, Maine: Touting to be a family-publication with “good reading for every member of the family done on a high moral plane,” the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac is in fact, using a four-letter word to describe this winter’s upcoming weather — Cold.

According to the 2014 edition of the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac, which hit store shelves on Monday, August 26th, “a large area of below-normal temperatures will predominate from roughly east of the Rocky Mountains to the Eastern Great Lakes.” The Almanac uses adjectives such as “biting, bitterly and piercing” to describe how cold it believes this winter will be. In its forecast, the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac forewarns that the “coldest temperatures will run south and east across the Laurentian Plateau to the Great Lakes. Only along the Pacific Coast and Maritime Provinces will winter temperatures average close to normal.”

What about snow?

Precipitation wise, “drier than normal precipitation amounts are expected over British Columbia… and over the Prairies near-normal precipitation amounts are expected.” But in Ontario and Quebec a snowy winter season should be on tap. The Maritimes could vacillate between bouts of rain and snow.

“We do see significant snowfalls for parts of every zone,” shares Canadian Farmers’ Almanac Managing Sandi Duncan, adding that people in Quebec and the Maritimes should especially take note of the first two weeks of February as the Almanac predicts some volatile winter weather during that time. (More weather outlooks at www.farmersalmanac.com)

The 2014 Canadian Farmers’ Almanac, which contains 16 months of weather forecasts (September 2013 through December 2014) offers a broad outlook for the winter, spring and summer forecast ahead, as well as month-by-month zones forecasts the country. Many readers consult the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac to prepare for the upcoming seasons, as well as pick dates for vacations and weddings.

In addition to weather, the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac also contains articles, tips, and advice on ways to live a more natural and simple life. This year’s new edition offers sage advice on ways to use bananas, olive oil and potatoes to help cure dry, winter skin, provides advice on ways to help curb your dog’s bad breath and gas issues, shares tasty recipes for homemade bread, offers ways to keep cool during the summer as well as how to keep safe during winter and summer power outages, and contains exclusive best days charts on things from gardening to fishing to quitting smoking.

“It’s not just for farmers and it’s not just for grandparents” states the Almanac’s editors, suggesting that “as life gets more complicated, the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac becomes even more important, as it offers unique and refreshing advice that helps you live a more independent, and sustainable lifestyle.”
The 2014 Canadian Farmers’ Almanac is available starting on August 26, 2013, at bookstores, grocery stores, and online at www.farmersalmanac.com

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.