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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Farmers’ Almanac Predicts Soggy Spring

PRESS RELEASE

DATE: March 19, 2013
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Peter Geiger, Philom., Editor 207-755-2246 – pgeiger@farmersalmanac.com
Sandi Duncan, Philom., Managing Editor, 207-755-2349 – sduncan@farmersalmanac.com

LEWISTON, Maine — Spring is on the way, but don’t expect March to go out like a lamb this year, says the Farmers’ Almanac.

The vernal equinox, which marks the official beginning of spring, will take place this year on Wednesday, March 20, at 7:02 a.m. EDT. But the coming of spring won’t put an end to the wild weather of the past winter. The Farmers’ Almanac long-range forecast, which was compiled two years ago, warns of wetter-than-normal conditions in many regions.

“Spring showers will be abundant, along with a number of unusually violent storms,” said Peter Geiger, Philom., editor of the 196-year-old publication.

Along the East Coast, look for a couple of major coastal storms during late March, with high winds and heavy precipitation during Easter weekend, including the possibility of snowfall in the New England area.

The 2013 Farmers’ Almanac red-flagged the days around the change of season for a major snows/rain storm along the Atlantic coast, a prediction that became reality as portions of New England were pounded with as much as 20 inches of snow on Tuesday.

Unsettled skies are expected to remain as March turns to April, with alternating periods of heavy thundershowers and pleasant sunshine throughout the rest of the season.

The Farmers’ Almanac is calling for a soggy spring in the Midwest and Great Lakes region, with mostly wet weather prevailing though mid-June.

In the northern plains, Rockies, and south central states, the opening days of spring are expected to be pleasant, followed by rain over Easter weekend. While the North Central region can expect many periods of pleasant and sunny weather, there will also be plenty of storm activity. In particular, the Almanac predicts heavy downpours, damaging winds and hail for much of the region during second week of May.

A few weeks later, in early June, residents of the plains states can expect to see dangerous thunderstorms, with the potential for tornadoes. During that same time period, the Gulf Coast could see some early tropical storm activity.

Along the west coast, look for pleasant weather during the first week of spring, followed by wet, gusty, changeable weather over Easter weekend. The remainder of spring will be wet, with many periods of wet squally weather. The season will end with a hot, dry period in early June.

The Farmers’ Almanac bases its long-range weather forecasts on a top-secret mathematical and astronomical formula that figures in sunspot activity, tidal action, the position of the planet in relation to the Sun, as well as a number of other factors. Faithful readers of the Farmers’ Almanac estimate that its annual weather forecast is accurate between 80 and 85 percent of the time. For more information about weather, astronomy, and the best days for planting, fishing and more, pick up a copy of the 2013 Farmers’ Almanac or visit on the Web at www.farmersalmanac.com.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.