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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Will Winter Return to Canada with a Vengeance?

FARMERS’ ALMANAC PRESS RELEASE
DATE: August 27, 2012
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Peter Geiger, Philom., Editor – 207-755-2246 pgeiger@farmersalmanac.com

Sandi Duncan, Philom., Managing Editor -207-755-2349 sduncan@farmersalmanac.com

Will Winter Return to Canada with a Vengeance?

Lewiston, Maine: After a year of unprecedented warmth, the great debate over whether or not Old Man Winter will return with a vengeance is on.

Last winter much of Canada experienced yet another unseasonably warm season. Some locations in far northern Canada saw temperatures approaching an incredible 10° C above normal. This summer has also been a hot one with some areas experience less than normal rainfall.

Fortunately, the new 2013 Canadian Farmers’ Almanac hits store shelves this month and promises on its cover to answer whether or not the warm, dry trend will continue, or if winter will stage a comeback.

According to this favored long-range weather publication, winter will return to some — but not all — areas.
It will be a “winter of contraries” shares editor Peter Geiger, Philom, adding, “It’s like Old Man Winter is cutting the country in half. The eastern half of Canada will see plenty of cold and snow. The western half will experience relatively warm and dry conditions.”

According to the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac, areas from Alberta and Saskatchewan east into the Maritimes will see a colder than normal winter with many locations experiencing above normal precipitation. But for British Columbia — chiefly those areas west and south of the Rocky Mountains — the overall winter will be milder and drier than normal.

While some may question where these weather predictions come from, the Canadian Farmers’ Almanac weather forecasts are based on an unbiased mathematical and astronomical formula that dates back to 1818.

“We admit that last winter’s forecasts weren’t as dead-on as we would have liked, but as the old saying goes, ‘The Almanac maker predicts the weather, but another Maker makes the weather,’ ” reflects Geiger, adding “Weather, no matter what tools or computer systems you use to predict it, is not an exact science. Many sources were thrown off last year, but we are confident in our formula and are happy to provide our readers with a long-range outlook that is very accurate.”

Fans of the Almanac say its famous long-range forecast is accurate between 80 and 85 percent of the time.

The 2013 Canadian Farmers’ Almanac is also packed with initiatives and invaluable advice on how to live a simpler, smarter, more sustainable lifestyle, including advice on how to reduce waste, extend the gardening season, and eliminate toxic chemicals from the home. In addition, this year’s Canadian Farmers’ Almanac includes the publication’s popular calendar of Best Days to quit smoking, find a new job and more, as well as the exclusive Gardening by the Moon Calendar, and valuable outdoor advice, including average frost dates, and tips for safe hunting and fishing.

Every year, millions of faithful readers seek out the down-home wit, wisdom, and proven advice that have made the Farmers’ Almanac a household name. Weather is the most talked about subject on earth, which makes the annual Canadian Farmers’ Almanac weather predictions a hot topic. Many people use its long-range outlook to stock up on firewood, take vacations, pick best days to get married, and generally prepare their homes for what the next few seasons may bring weather-wise.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.