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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Summer Will Be Hot and Stormy, Warns Farmers’ Almanac

FARMERS’ ALMANAC
PRESS RELEASE

 

DATE: April 15, 2011
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Peter Geiger, Philom., Editor 207-755-2246 – pgeiger@farmersalmanac.com

Sandi Duncan, Philom., Managing Editor, 207-755-2349 – sduncan@farmersalmanac.com

Summer Will Be Hot and Stormy, Warns Farmers’ Almanac

LEWISTON, Maine — After what proved to be a long, cold winter for much of the country, the Farmers’ Almanac is releasing its predictions for the coming summer.

“For many parts of the country, the past winter was most certainly a ‘cold slap in the face,’ just as we warned in the 2011 edition of the Farmers’ Almanac,” said Peter Geiger, Philom., editor of the 193-year-old publication.

“The good news is, winter is now over. The bad news is, we’re calling for the coming summer to be just as turbulent as winter was in many of the same regions.”

The Farmers’ Almanac is predicting a greater-than-normal tally of locally strong thunderstorms this summer, particularly over the eastern third of the country, where some much heavier-than-normal precipitation could fall over New England. Some of this activity could be especially severe, and even lead to widespread tornado activity in the tornado belt early in June and again during mid-July. Portions of the Central and Southern Rockies and the Great Plains could also see a lot of thunderstorms.

As June turns to July, the weather will become hotter in most regions. The Farmers’ Almanac is calling for a spell of widespread extreme heat and humidity for the latter days of summer, predominantly during late August. About two-thirds of the country is expected to experience above-normal summer temperatures, with an unusually large region of much above-normal temperatures for the southern and eastern states.

Along the West Coast and into the Northern Rockies, conditions will be calmer, with average precipitation and more seasonal temperatures. Only the Pacific Northwest will experience cooler than normal temperatures for much of the season.

Hurricane season officially begins on June 1, and the Farmers’ Almanac is warning those living along the Eastern Seaboard look for an active season, with threats raging from the Gulf of Mexico all the way up to the Canadian Maritimes. A tropical disturbance could deliver some adverse weather to New England’s coast in early August, while hurricane activity is expected to threaten the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic regions toward the end of the month. Tropical activity could also affect the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast as summer draws to a close.

The Farmers’ Almanac bases its long-range weather forecasts on a top-secret mathematical and astronomical formula that figures in sunspot activity, tidal action, the position of the planet in relation to the Sun, as well as a number of other factors. Faithful readers of the Farmers’ Almanac estimate that its annual weather forecast is accurate between 80 and 85 percent of the time. For more information about weather, astronomy, and the best days for planting, fishing and more, pick up a copy of the 2011 Farmers’ Almanac or visit on the Web at www.farmersalmanac.com.

For more images and reproducible images go to http://www.farmersalmanac.com/images-for-the-press

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.