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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Brides Beware: Some States Fare Worse for Wedding Weather Disasters

Lewiston, ME & Savannah, GA: Mother Nature seems to favor some states more than others, when it comes to doling out good weather on wedding days.

Based on submissions to the Farmers’ Almanac Worst Wedding Weather Contest, couples marrying in Texas, Florida, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania have experienced the soggiest, snowiest, windiest, most hurricane-hampered and hail-ridden wedding weather. Meanwhile, brides and grooms who walk down the aisle in South Carolina, Arizona, Oregon, Utah, or North Dakota had the fewest amount of Worst Wedding Weather contest entries, suggesting couples may experience less wedding weather surprises in these states.

“Judging by contest entries alone, Texas is not the best place to tie the knot,” said Peter Geiger, Philom., editor of the Lewiston, Maine Farmers’ Almanac and advisor to Savannah-based Farmers’ Almanac TV. “The Lone Star state had the highest number of worst wedding weather stories, everything from freezing rain in April, to floods, to stifling hot temperatures.”

Geiger, who launched the “Worst Wedding Weather Contest” on The Today Show last August, asked couples across the United States to share their worst wedding weather experience online at FarmersAlmanac.com. “The results were astonishing,” reports Geiger, “with 500 entries there was every kind of not-so-nice weather scenario you can imagine.”

On Valentine’s Day, a panel of Farmers’ Almanac judges selected the 10 most weather-battered wedding entries. Now, the public is invited to read the tales of woe and vote for the best of the worst wedding weather stories at farmersalmanac.com/worstweddingweather Voting closes on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, 2008, and winners will be announced by March 31 on farmersalmanac.com

The couple with the most votes will win a romantic, seven-night, second honeymoon cruise aboard Royal Caribbean International, complete with vow renewals, airfare and $1,000 on board credit.

Farmers’ Almanac Top Ten Worst Wedding Weather Finalists Include:

  • Two Louisiana couples and a North Carolina couple who had hurricanes crash their wedding parties.
  • A Philadelphia area couple whose wedding day plans were postponed by record snowfall.
  • A Massachusetts couple caught off guard by a freak snowstorm in May.
  • Couples in Minnesota, Oklahoma and Texas whose weddings were dampened by heavy rain.
  • A Michigan couple whose Hawaii wedding vacation in paradise felt like an episode of Survivor.
  • An Indiana couple whose reception hall became an infirmary in the wake of a deadly tornado.

Prospective brides and grooms, as well as those planning events in the near future, can avoid an unwelcome surprise from Mother Nature by checking out the free, two-month weather forecast onFarmersAlmanac.com, or consulting the print edition of the Farmers’ Almanac which contains 16 months of forecasts, Geiger said.

“We get thousands of calls and website visits each year from brides and grooms to be, checking for dates when the weather will be best for their weddings,” revealed Geiger, “which is why the Farmers’ Almanac is often referred to as a ‘bride’s best friend.'”

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.