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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Repurpose Decorating

Repurpose Decorating

For those of us who live more than minutes away from a store, or want to reuse something rather than buy new, repurpose decorating is a fun way to find something in our home to serve our needs in a more decorative manner.

Countertop Crate Bookshelf
Keep your favorite cookbooks handy on the kitchen counter in a table-grapes crate. Don’t have one? Pick one up the next time you shop the farmers’ market. Set an empty fruit crate on its side and you have an instant bookshelf ready to fill with more than a dozen cookbooks.

Kitchen Towel Clothesline Curtains
Is it time to spruce up a kitchen or back door window? Don’t run to the store. Instead, dig through your linen drawer for a window treatment. Most likely you already have colorful kitchen towels on hand that match your décor. Here’s an adorable window treatment ready in five minutes or less. All it takes is two kitchen towels, clothespins, twine, and a few small eyebolts. Screw the bolts into place above the window. Tautly stretch a line of twine through the eyebolts and tie a knot on each end. Pin two kitchen towels to the line with clothespins. Stand back and admire.

Currier & Ives Calendar Placemats
Love that old calendar you found in Grandpa’s attic? Dress your table with precious memories and lovely calendar pages of days gone by in charming, home-sweet-home fashion. These are sure to evoke fond memories of home, family, and farm. Shop antique stores, flea markets, or estate sales for an old picture calendar. Choose pages with nostalgic farm or landscape scenes for each place setting at your harvest table. Pages can be inexpensively laminated at the nearest office supply store or print shop.

1 comment

1 MiMi { 08.06.12 at 11:15 pm }

I use bib aprons for curtains. Most are vintage. I use cup hooks to hang them by the neck strap. I don’t have privacy issues so on the windows they just hang to frame the windows. On my back door they are hung the same except I loosely tie a waist strap from one to the other.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.