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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

6 Inexpensive Fall Decorating Ideas

6 Inexpensive Fall Decorating Ideas

Fall is a festive time of year. Here are 6 quick and easy ways to decorate your home with some autumn classics.

Hollow out a few mini-pumpkins and place a tea light inside of each. Add a few colorful leaves around the pumpkins and place on a mantel or dining room table. Simple and elegant.

Instead of cutting the stem out of pumpkins to be carved, cut the hole on the bottom of the pumpkin. Then place the carved pumpkin on top of the candle.

Fill a shiny colander with red apples and small orange pumpkins for festive harvest-time centerpieces.

Candy corn looks cute in a glass vase or on the bottom of a glass hurricane candle holder.

Use a tall, thin pumpkin as a vase for flowers. Clean out the inside of the pumpkin (save seeds to roast) and place a small container (empty coffee can) inside to hold water for fresh flowers, or place piece of floral foam for dried flowers. Add flowers and place your new fall vase on a table.

Think natural! Get a tree branch from outside (check it for bugs) and place on table. Place miniature gourds, pumpkins, acorns and candles among the branches.

Got any ideas to add? Be sure to share.

3 comments

1 EasternHayandGrain { 10.16.12 at 9:32 pm }

Straw bales always add a beautiful touch with mums, gourds and pumpkins!

2 Kimber { 10.23.10 at 9:02 pm }

I like to use coffee beans the same way you suggested using candy corn, in glass candle holders or in the bottom of vases to hold stems of live or dried flowers. The rich, brown looks good with autumn colors. Select a fragrant blend such as Highlander Grog to enjoy the smell.

3 Rebecca { 10.20.10 at 11:31 am }

Tks for the ideas Love this site!!!!!!

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