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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Farmers’ Almanac Household Tips

Farmers’ Almanac Household Tips
Super Glue on Your Hands?
To remove, try soaking the glue areas in nail polish remover until the glue disappears, then wash with soap and water.

New White Glove Trick
Next time you set out to dust, wear a clean but old cotton glove and simply dust with your hand. This will save you from having to carry around a rag.

Microwave Deodorizers
Place a microwave-safe bowl filled halfway to the top with water and 2 tablespoons of lemon juice, or a cut-up lemon, in the microwave. Cook on high for 40 to 60 seconds.

Burn the Popcorn?
Place 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract in a bowl and heat for 30 seconds. Keep door closed for 10 to 12 hours. Remove bowl and wipe inside of microwave.

Crayon on Walls?

Try a hair dryer. Focus the heat on the crayon wax, which should melt and wipe easily away. If the color remains (which usually happens if it’s red), wet a cloth with bleach and wipe.

Wicker Furniture Tip
Clean wicker furniture by spraying furniture polish or dusting spray onto an inexpensive paintbrush. Then brush away the dust. This will help you to get to all the hard-to-reach dust spots, and it takes a lot less time.

Homemade Mildew Remover
To remove mildew from tile “the old fashioned way,” try washing tiles and grout with detergent and scrub with a brush. Then apply a solution of 3 tablespoons of liquid bleach to a quart of warm water. Keep surface wet with this solution for 5 minutes.
Rinse and dry.

Bleach Smell on Hands?
Pour a little vinegar, or lemon juice, on your hands, then rinse. Bleach is alkaline, vinegar and lemon are acid, so they cancel each other out and balance the pH of your skin.

Scuff Marks
These can easily be removed from wood and linoleum floors with a tennis ball. Break a hole into the ball and attach to a long pole (broomstick or mop handle works well). Rub the ball over the spot and the scuff mark should transfer to the tennis ball.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.