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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

How did Frosty Become the Holiday Snowman?

How did Frosty Become the Holiday Snowman?

Frosty is one of the most successful additions to modern Christmas imagery. The song, written in 1950 by Steve Nelson and Jack Rawlins, was recorded by Gene Autry. It became the best-selling Christmas record of 1951. Frosty has some elements of a fairy tale, with a snowman who comes to life with the addition of a magical silk hat.

There is also some fairy tale poignancy about him, as Frosty begins to melt in the sun and so must hurry away, promising to return again some day.

A 1969 television cartoon was based on the story, and Frosty has also found his way into Christmas merchandising. There he has appeared as a doll, on coloring books, as candy and in many other manifestations that might have taxed the ingenuity of even the most magical of silk hats.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.