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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

10 Ways to Keep More Money in Your Pocket

10 Ways to Keep More Money in Your Pocket

The recent economic downturn has left many people struggling to stretch their hard earned dollars. How can you get the most for your money? Here are ten thrifty ways to keep money in your pocket.

  • Brown bag it to work instead of eating out for lunch everyday. This saves a lot of green, and you will be eating healthier.
  • Consider carpooling or use public transportation. Not only does it save on fuel costs, it reduces wear and tear on your vehicle.
  • Stock up on non-perishables when they go on sale. Items generally go on sale about once every 12 weeks. Buy enough to last you until the next sale.
  • Check out clearance racks for good deals on clothes going out of season. Thrift or consignment shops are another great source of inexpensive clothing.
  • Conserve energy. Turn off lights when you leave the room. Turn on the ceiling fans and adjust the thermostat. Shut down the computer when it’s not being used. Put TVs and other electronics on a power strip that can be turned off to avoid using phantom power.
  • Use real plates, cups, utensils, and napkins in lieu of disposables.
  • Take time to plan out your meals for a week. Then make a shopping list from menus. It’s very easy to buy impulse items, but if you stick to the list, you may be happier with the bill at the end.
  • Waste not, want not. Try to save and use leftovers. Get creative. Steak and chicken from the night before taste good in salads. Designate a night for “clean the fridge” night and get rid of all the leftovers that have been piling up.
  • Bring back the money jar. Put a jar in a high-traffic area in your home. When you have extra change, drop it in. Get in the habit, and after several months, you may be surprised how quickly these extra coins add up.
  • Pull out the board games. Instead of heading to the movies, why not break out the cards, checkers, or board games and have a fun night that doesn’t cost much.
  • If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.