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Go for the Glow with T’ai Chi and Qigong

Go for the Glow with T’ai Chi and Qigong

If you want your skin to have a healthy glow, try T’ai Chi or Qigong. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, the flow of energy (called “Qi” or “Chi”) through the body takes place along multiple pathways called meridians. These meridians run from head to toe, both on the surface and on the inside of the body. When the body’s energy is blocked, it can lead to a myriad of health problems.

T’ai Chi and Qigong, which are related to the martial arts, involve moving the body so that the “flow of energy” becomes more effective. An “increased flow” can lead to an “increased glow.” Looking for an inexpensive facial? Several of the body’s major energetic pathways cross the face. When the energy flow is improved, the face appears more relaxed and the skin looks healthier.

T’ai Chi and Qigong are also known to be useful for improving flexibility, strength, coordination and balance. Practitioners of T’ai Chi and Qigong note an improvement in their sleep, and report feeling more calm in their daily activities.

Studies show that T’ai Chi and Qigong have a positive impact on:

– Osteoarthritis
– Improved immunity to the chicken-pox like virus that causes shingles
– Infection-fighting white cells
– High blood pressure
– Pain and symptoms related to fibromyalgia
– Fall prevention

Dr. Nan Lu of the Traditional Chinese Medicine World Foundation believes that Qigong enables the body to use its own energy to ‘heal itself.’ He has created programs for weight loss, stress reduction, menopause and breast cancer prevention, using a particular form of Qigong called “Wu Ming” Qigong.

T’ai Chi and Qigong have the added benefit of being accessible to individuals with all levels of fitness and health. Many organizations around the country offer T’ai Chi classes to cancer patients and survivors, in which participants perform movements from a seated position.

Whether you are looking for help with a health problem, or simply ‘going for the glow,’ T’ai Chi and Qigong offer an easy way to get your body’s energy moving in the right direction.

4 comments

1 Afshin Mokhtari { 08.24.11 at 5:18 am }

I have first-hand experience of the power of taiji (tai-chi) and qi-gong, so I’m a true believer. However, I see that so often descriptions used to describe these practices are wrapped in flowery vague words that steal away credit from their effectiveness. In the case of taiji, I feel so strongly about this that I wrote an article describing exactly what it is about it that makes it so good for you. Its at http://qi-harmony.com/the-taiji-difference/

2 RhondaLynn { 08.21.11 at 9:11 am }

It is true that keeping the body active both stimulates bloodflow and oxygen throughout the body. Yet, there is another aspect that needs to be recognized in conjunction with physical exercise. The right frame of mind constitutes both an outher glow and inner glow when put into practice. The eternal life that comes by, and is built in God gives us both that glow, and a perfect countenance. And therefore, a wonderful energy. Call it, ELECTRICITY.

3 Dragonfly { 08.18.11 at 6:01 pm }

Martial arts is one of the best ways to exercise but one must keep in mind especialy if your are getting a little older is that we must start off slowly at first. I know, I have been doing martial arts for over 30 years and if get going to fast first thing in the morning with my streches I will usually pull some muscle or get a cramp. So start slow and you will have a great start to your day.

4 Mary T. { 08.17.11 at 10:24 am }

I love martial arts, but have almost completely gotten out of the habit of doing my stretches. Thank you for giving me even more incentive than I began with, years ago!

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