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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Cold Hands and Feet? Try This

Cold Hands and Feet? Try This

If your icy hands or feet make you feel chilled all the time, or cause loved ones to shriek when you touch them, you may need to boost your circulation. Here are some simple solutions for warming up those cold hands and feet. Do try these at home!

– Eat less saturated fat and sugar. And up your intake of omega-3 fatty acids, found in foods like fish, olive oil, avocado, nuts, and flax seeds, which promote healthy circulation.

– Quit smoking. Nicotine is one of the most common causes of circulatory problems.

– Drink more water. You blood can’t flow properly if you don’t hydrate your body enough.

– Get some exercise. Getting at least 30 minutes of exercise every day gets the blood flowing and keeps it flowing.

– Get a massage. Regular massage stimulates your circulatory system to blood flowing, and prevents it from getting “stuck” and becoming oxygen starved in tight, knotted muscles.

– Take a hot shower. Stimulating the skin with hot water can also increase blood flow closer to the surface.

– Drink some wine. Any alcoholic beverage — just one per day, though, to prevent negative side effects — will dilate you blood vessels, including the smaller ones in your hands and feet, allowing your blood to flow more freely. Red wine has the added benefit of containing health-promoting antioxidants, too.

– Try a ginkgo biloba supplement. Like wine, ginkgo opens up the blood vessels, allowing blood to flow into more constricted areas.

– Eat something spicy. Some foods – including cayenne pepper, ginger, garlic, and onions – are known for their ability to improve circulation and relax the muscles.

10 comments

1 Kate Sommers { 11.03.13 at 5:37 pm }

I use natural, organic wool socks for my feet, no sweat no overheating and my favorite brand is Mr Woolly Socks. Life savers for me.

2 Memory muchemwa { 06.25.13 at 8:15 am }

Have very cold feet and hands

3 Doreen { 01.04.13 at 9:30 am }

Horse Chestnut Extract – promotes vein health. Along with circulation, it eases pain in the extremities.

4 Deron { 01.19.12 at 9:29 am }

Co-Q10 also works very well for circualtion

5 KatyO { 01.18.12 at 6:13 pm }

Don’t forget to eat some hot peppers…you may also try putting cayene pepper in your socks just a little….trappers used that remedy.

6 JustMe { 01.17.12 at 2:19 pm }

Niacin helps too. Small doses (1/2 tablet of a 100 mg tablet) is all that is needed and be sure to take with water and protein. It’s a B vitamin and helps open up all the blood vessels thus increasing your circulation. I’ve also found it helps with my tendonitis in my wrist and the knot in my shoulder muscle – eliminating the pain and inflamation in the muscles.

7 alaina { 02.18.11 at 9:17 am }

Also, pick up some HealthiFeet. It works great. It helps get your circulation going in your feet. It has helped me. :)

8 Dorthea { 01.28.11 at 8:48 pm }

Thank you very much for the info!!!

9 James K { 01.12.11 at 1:21 pm }

Try on a pair of Poly-Propolean gloves and socks.
They wic away water from skin. US Military has been using these for years. I used them when I was stationed in Alaska. Where it gets down to -50 degrees or more.. Plus if they do get wet, they dry out very fast.. A saying in Alaska,” Cotton Kills”. It takes almost 12 hours for cotton socks to dry out..
Yes, also stay away from Nicotine…

10 Jerry { 01.10.11 at 9:45 am }

Thanks for this one, I get this sometimes. This year I will be on omega-3 pills so I hopes that helps. I will also look at the flax seeds which I heard to good for your body.

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