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A Recipe for Healthy Hair

A Recipe for Healthy Hair

Wintertime can be beautiful, but the dry air certainly doesn’t do beautiful things to our hair. If your hair becomes, dry, brittle, frizzy, dull, flat, or otherwise undesirable during the chill of winter, there are some simple home remedies you can try to get it looking its best. These common kitchen staples add up to a recipe for healthy hair:

– Beer: Leave a can or bottle of beer open until it turns flat, and use it as a conditioner after shampooing.

– Lemon juice: Mix it with water during your final rinse for shiny, bouncy hair.

– Honey: Mix three teaspoons of honey into a pint of water as a hair lotion, or use pure honey to moisturize your scalp once a week.

– Mayonnaise: Apply about a tablespoon, and rub it into your hair and scalp. Cover it with a shower cap and leave it in for about 30 minutes. Rinse it out thoroughly with warm water.

– Eggs: Once a week, beat an egg and massage it into your hair and scalp. Let it sit for at least 15 minutes, then rinse the hair with cool water (warm water will harden the egg and make it harder to rinse out). Wash as normal.

– Avocado and banana: Mash up a peeled overripe banana and a peeled and pitted avocado. Rub the mixture into your hair. Leave it in for up to an hour, then rinse with warm water.

– Olive oil: Rub olive oil into your scalp before bed. Cover your hair with a shower cap and leave it on overnight. Shampoo it out in the morning.

– Vinegar: There are many benefits to rinsing your hair in vinegar. Not only is it an excellent cleansing agent, vinegar also makes a great conditioner that can promote strength and luster. Just add a little vinegar to your hair when you rinse your normal shampoo, or massage it into your scalp several times each week before showering. Vinegar will not only tame frizz by repairing damaged hair shafts, it can also help to treat dandruff.

– Nuts: Don’t put them on you hair, though. Just eat them. Nuts and seeds — such as sunflower seeds or flax seeds — contain essential fatty acids that can add sheen to your hair from the inside out.

6 comments

1 Jaime McLeod { 09.26.12 at 9:17 am }

Peggy,
There are specialty shampoos on the market for hard water. You may need to go to a specialty beauty supply store to find them. Alternately, you can buy a filter that will softer your water.

2 peggy rickard { 09.21.12 at 1:58 pm }

Whay can I use for shampoo in hard well water? I have fragile hair because of health issues. My grand daughte also needs a gentle shampoo that works with well water. She is 4 and has hair down to her butt but is getting dry

3 Bobbi { 06.06.12 at 8:55 am }

What kind of vinegar do you put on your hair, regular or apple cider?

4 wandakay { 01.08.11 at 12:26 pm }

Actually, raw Apple cider vinegar mixed with a little raw honey and water is extremely good for your digestion, which promotes good hair, skin, nails, etc. About a tbsp with each meal, and during lung troubles it’s very helpful to clear out mucous. Have an awesome day! Wanda

5 Irene Molskness { 01.05.11 at 4:02 pm }

I enjoy about weather etc ,My grandmother went by moon signs
Thanks

6 FoodMagick { 01.03.11 at 1:42 pm }

Actually, all of the items listed except beer and vinegar would help the condition of our skin and hair a lot more if we put them INTO our bodies instead of onto it.

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