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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Boost Your Immune System

Boost Your Immune System

Sending your children to school, stepping inside the local gym, or even putting your hands on a grocery store cart can compromise your health. Risks of bacteria, toxins, flu viruses and colds, with fevers, throat infections, and coughs abound. There are preventative measures we can take to strengthen our body’s natural defenses against attack. Putting these wellness tips into practice will help boost your body’s immune system and decrease your vulnerability to sickness.

1. Take vitamin C and a quality multivitamin (without iron) daily. Other antioxidant-rich natural supplements with antiviral effects include: elderberry, black currant, CoQ10 (ubiquinone), garlic, olive leaf extract, zinc, resveratrol, Pycnogenol, green or white tea extracts, acai berry, echinacea, quercetin, curcumin and alpha lipoic acid. (Ask your naturopath professional which of these supplements best suits your health needs before taking.)

2. Eat 5 to 10 servings of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables daily, such as fruits, blueberries, broccoli, melons, sweet and hot peppers, carrots, and dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale. Consume high fiber foods, like fruits, potatoes, dark green leafy vegetables, flaxseed, and brown rice to rid the body of toxins. Don’t get enough vegetables in your diet? Drink a natural green beverage. It’s easy to make your own healthy green drink. (We call ours ABC.) Purchase powdered alfalfa, barley, and carrot. Mix equal amounts together in a container. Add one heaping tablespoon powder mixture to 1/2 cup water or apple juice, shake or stir and drink, first thing each morning.

3. Have some local, raw honey, in moderation, daily. (Raw honey has not been processed: heated or filtered.) Raw honey has powerful antioxidant properties and contains bee pollen and propolis, which not only boost the immune system but have anticancer properties, builds immunities to allergies, aid in detoxification, increase energy levels, and contain beneficial enzymes and antimicrobial properties. Buy directly from a local beekeeper. Ask if chemicals were used in the colonies. Do not purchase if they were. Take note! Children under one year old should not consume honey.

4. Exercise 5 to 6 days a week for at least 30 minutes a day, or for 60 minutes a day for the best results.
Regular exercise helps with lowering inflammation in your body. According to the latest medical findings, inflammation is more detrimental to your health than bad cholesterol. Exercise is also a great stress reducer. Combine cardiovascular exercises with weight training exercises. Do resistance exercises or other muscle building exercises, daily.

5. Avoid obesity. Don’t overeat. If you have a tendency to overeat, begin each meal with a piece of fresh fruit or a green salad. Take modest portions. Don’t rush through meals; relax and eat slowly. Wait 10 minutes after eating before taking seconds. It takes at least that long for your stomach to tell your brain that it’s full. Better yet, eliminate second servings.

1 comment

1 Annette { 06.30.14 at 11:06 am }

I am disappointed that adequate sleep was not included in this reading. It is widely evident that adequate sleep is a major factor in acquiring and maintaining a strong and healthy immune system.

2 valerie { 09.06.10 at 12:19 pm }

like this article,good info.thanks

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