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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Irish Stout Beef Stew

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Irish Stout Beef Stew

Ingredients:
2 pounds beef stew meat, cubed
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
2 large onions, chopped
3 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 1/2 cups Irish stout
2 cups chopped carrot
Salt and ground black pepper to taste

Directions:
Pour one tablespoon olive oil over the beef cubes and toss until coated. In a separate bowl, combine flour, salt and pepper. Dredge the beef in the flour mixture until completely coated. Heat the remaining oil in a large pot over medium-high heat and add the beef. Brown on all sides of the beef, then add onions and garlic. Dilute the tomato paste with a small amount of water to dilute, just enough to make it slightly runny, pour into the pan, and stir to blend. Reduce the heat to medium, cover, and cook for five minutes. Pour 1/2 cup of stout into the pan and bring it to a boil, carefully scraping the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon to prevent the meat and vegetables from sticking. Pour in the rest of the beer, carrots, and thyme. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer for at least two hours, stirring occasionally.

4 comments

1 Jaime McLeod { 02.20.14 at 4:07 pm }

It’s a stock photo.

2 tyson robertson { 02.17.14 at 4:16 pm }

No potatoes? You show them in the photo but not in the ingredient list nor mention them in the instructions. Whats the deal?

3 Ruthanne Magrath { 08.14.13 at 11:57 am }

Beef muscle meat can be cut into steak, roasts or short ribs. Some cuts are processed (corned beef or beef jerky), and trimmings, usually mixed with meat from older, leaner cattle, are ground, minced or used in sausages. The blood is used in some varieties of blood sausage. `*;*

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4 wmatthias { 03.13.13 at 12:35 pm }

The end of the recipe called for Thyme, but ingredients list doesn’t include thyme. How much for the recipe?

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