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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Candy Cane Whoopies

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Candy Cane Whoopies

Ingredients:
1 cup all purpose flour
1/4 cup cocoa
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/4 teaspoon peppermint extract
2 cups powdered sugar
12 large candy canes, crushed

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350° F. In a bowl, sift together flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt. Set aside. In a measuring cup, stir together 3/4 cup milk, and vanilla. Set aside. Using an electric mixer, cream together the brown sugar and 1/4 cup of the butter. Add the egg and reduce speed to low. Add about a quarter of the combined dry ingredients and a third of milk mixture and beat together. Repeat until all ingredients have been thoroughly and a smooth batter forms. Using a tablespoon, portion out mounds of batter, spaced about 2” apart, on parchment-lined cookie sheets. Bake for 11 min. Transfer the baked shells to a wire rack to cool. Using a mixer, whip together 1/2 cup of butter, until fluffy. Add mint extract and 2 tablespoons milk. With the mixer on low, gradually add powdered sugar. Beat until fluffy. Fold 1/4 cup crushed candy canes into the filling. Using level tablespoons, top half of the shells with icing, then add a second shell to create a sandwich. Be sure to spread the filling to the edges of each. Roll the edges of each whoopie pie in the remaining crushed candy canes, and serve. Dust with powdered sugar if desired.

2 comments

1 Autumn { 01.29.14 at 4:55 pm }

This is a yummy stuff to eat It took me 3 hours to make 340 of them

2 Vickie { 12.19.12 at 11:22 am }

Looks fantastic. :)

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