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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

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Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Ingredients:
(Filling)
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup flour, sifted
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1 lb. fresh rhubarb
1 pint strawberries
2 tablespoons butter
(Pastry)
3 cups flour, sifted
2 teaspoons salt
1 cup vegetable shortening
8 tablespoons cold water
2 tablespoons melted butter

Directions:
To make the pie crust, sift flour and salt into a medium bowl. Cut in shortening with a fork or pastry blender until mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle cold water, one tablespoon at a time and mix lightly with a fork just until the pastry holds together and leaves sides of bowl clean. Make a ball. Flatten it. Wrap the dough in plastic and store in the refrigerator until ready for use.

Preheat your oven to 425° F. Mix sugar, flour, cinnamon, and cloves in a bowl. Wash rhubarb, trim ends, and cut into 1″ pieces. Measure out six cups and set aside. Wash strawberries, hull and halve them. Measure out four cups and place them in a large bowl, along with the rhubarb cubes. Place both in a large bowl. Sprinkle with sugar mixture and toss lightly to mix. Let stand 15 minutes.
Remove the pastry from the refrigerator and separate it into two sections, one slightly larger than the other. Roll the larger one out into a 14” circle on a lightly floured surface, and the other into a 10” circle. Place the 14” crust at the bottom of a greased 10” pie pan.
Toss the rhubarb mixture once more before pouring it into the pastry. Cover the filling with the 10” crust and crimp the edges of the two crusts together. Brush the top with melted butter, sprinkle with sugar, and cut a small vent. Bake for about 40 minutes, until pastry is golden. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.