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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Palak Paneer

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Ingredients
1 16-oz. package Spinach, chopped, frozen
1 cup paneer (from a specialty store, or make your own)
3 tbsp olive oil
2 medium onions, minced
1 tbsp ginger, minced
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup water
2 large tomatoes, diced, or 1 14-oz can, pureed
2 tsp Garam Masala
1 tsp cumin powder
2 tsp coriander powder
1/4 tsp turmeric powder
8 tbsp heavy whipping cream
Red chili powder to taste
Salt to taste

Directions
Cook frozen spinach with 1/2 cup Water in a microwave safe dish for 7-8 minutes stirring in between. Blend cooked spinach to desired texture (avoid over-blending). Heat 2 tbsp oil in a medium non-stick pan on high heat. Once oil is hot, add in the minced onions, stir, cover and let it cook for about 5 minutes. Add in the ginger and garlic and mix. Cook for another 4-5 minutes. Add in the tomatoes, cover and cook till the oil separates from the mixture. Keep stirring frequently as the Masala (onion, tomato, ginger, and garlic mixture) tends to burn very fast. While the Masala is cooking, cube the paneer to desired size…1/2″ cubes work well. In a non-stick frying pan, heat the remaining 1 tbsp oil. Once oil is hot, add in the paneer cubes and let them cook till they are golden brown on all sides. Remove from the pan into a plate with paper towel to soak the excess oil. In a couple of minutes, pour the Paneer into a bowl of cold water. Let it sit for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, once the Masala is prepared, add in the mashed spinach. Mix and add the Garam Masala, cumin powder, coriander powder, salt, chili powder, and turmeric powder. Mix well and cook for 3-5 minutes. Add in the cream. Mix and cook for another few minutes. Gently squeeze the water out of the paneer and put the paneer in the spinach. Mix gently and serve hot. Enjoy with naan, chapati, or brown rice.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.