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The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Labneh (Yogurt Cheese)

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Labneh (Yogurt Cheese)

Labneh is a tart, spreadable cheese that is easily flavored with herbs and salt. It’s great on crackers, bagels, vegetable crudites, and crusty bread. It is best to use a yogurt with active live cultures, meaning it is not pasteurized

Yield: 8 oz.

Ingredients
1 quart fresh plain yogurt (not pasteurized!)
Sea Salt (optional)
Fresh or dried herbs (optional)

Directions
Let the yogurt come to room temperature (about 72° F), then pour it into a colander lined with butter muslin or another finely woven cloth. Tie the corners of the muslin into a knot and hang the bag to drain for 12-24 hours, until the yogurt has stopped dripping and has reached the desired consistency – thick and creamy. Remove the cheese from the bag. Add salt and/or herbs to taste (i.e. garlic powder/roasted garlic, basil, oregano). Store in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Don’t miss our story on basic cheese making.

1 comment

1 Cheryl { 07.13.11 at 11:43 am }

this is how I start making cucumber dip.
I drain the yogurt overnight and in the morning add shredded cucumbers, dill, minced garlic and a little olive oil. Tastes similar to the tzaziki they serve in Greek restaurants!

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