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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

St. Patrick’s Day Recipes with a Twist!

St. Patrick’s Day Recipes with a Twist!

Love the wearing of the green? Do you line up six hours early at the parade route to get the best vantage point? Maybe your husband’s former college roommates leave him nostalgic cell phone messages on St. Patrick’s Day about cherished green beer fests at the frat house. And does he sneak out the door for more?! (Incidentally, sometime after the turn of the 20th Century and until the 1970s, bars and pubs were closed on March 17th in Ireland because celebratory drinking had previously gotten out of hand. Hmmmmm.)

Pubs and parades withstanding, and in as many ways as we strive to honor St. Patrick–known in hagiographies as The Apostle of Ireland– perhaps the family’s a bit tired of the old tried-and-true corned beef and cabbage, Irish stew or Irish soda bread. While tradition is as it should be, there’s nothing wrong this St. Patrick’s Day with offering up an alternative corned beef spread for crackers or a fruit and spice bread!

These inspired recipes celebrate tradition but with a kicked-up holiday twist everyone will enjoy. Erin go bragh (or in Ireland actually Eirinn go Brach)! Shamrock smoothie, anyone?

Corned Beef Spread
Ingredients:
2 cups mayonnaise
2 cups (16 ounces) sour cream
1 medium onion, finely chopped
2 tablespoons dill weed
1 teaspoon seasoned salt
2 cups diced cooked corned beef
Onion bagels, split and cut into wedges or snack rye bread

Directions:
In a large bowl, combine mayonnaise, sour cream, onion, dill, seasoned salt, and corned beef. Cover and refrigerate until serving. Serve with bagel wedges or rye bread. Yield: 4 cups.

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3 comments

1 Cindy H. { 03.15.13 at 10:39 am }

The corned beef spread sounds yummy!

2 John Baker { 03.13.13 at 12:07 pm }

John try these recipes!

3 Denise Cefalu' { 03.13.13 at 8:57 am }

Wow All those recipes sounds so delicious…Thank you Beth for sharing :)

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