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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Muffin Mania!

Muffin Mania!

At least 4 days a week, I eat the same boring breakfast — steel cut oats, flaxseed, granola, half of a Granny Smith apple and some walnuts. Nutritious, healthy, filling? Yes, yes, yes! Warm and fuzzy? For me, no! I do it because it’s supposed to be good for me. What gives me a “warm and fuzzy” feeling is a warm muffin, the smell of freshly baked goods and a hot cup of coffee or tea on a cold fall or winter’s morning.

When I was young, and it was a snowy day, I’d be waiting with my ear pressed to the window for a good long time listening for the whining of the sirens which let us know that school was canceled for the day. Then I’d hop back into bed only to be awakened by the smell of cinnamon wafting through the air making its way upstairs to my bedroom. My mom used to make these great oatmeal muffins that were dipped in butter, cinnamon, and sugar. I never thought about calories back then — I don’t think I even knew what a calorie was. But as the years go by, I’m always thinking of how I can make something I loved to eat that may or may not have been that good for me, healthier. Plus, as I always say, moderation is the key.

Here are several muffin recipes that are great on a cold morning, or whenever you want to snuggle up and have a warm, comforting breakfast. You can try some of the modifications as I suggested to lower the calorie count, or use the “moderation is the key” method of eating!

Oatmeal Muffins/Cake
Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees and spray some non-stick cooking spray on your muffin tin.
Ingredients:
1 cup of quick cooking oatmeal
3/4 cup of milk (whole, 1 or 2% or skim)
1/2 cup of vegetable oil — I use ¼ cup of oil and ¼ cup of applesauce to cut the fat count
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
1 egg
1 cup of flour (I split the cup up between white, wheat, oat and soy flour)
3 teaspoons baking powder
Dash of salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

Directions:
Mix the first 5 ingredients in a medium sized mixing bowl.
Sift the next 5 ingredients and then add them to the wet ingredients. Stir with a spoon until well mixed, but not over mixed. Spoon the batter into the muffin tins and bake for about 25 minutes. Start checking them after 20 minutes with a toothpick. After they are cooked and have sat for about 5 minutes, remove them from the muffin tin and you can either eat them as is, or brush a little butter on them and sprinkle with some cinnamon & sugar. Or, you can put the batter into a small baking pan to make a cake instead, and cover with a crumb topping. Bake for 30 minutes.

Crumb Topping:
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup all-purpose flour (or you can mix in some wheat flour)
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
Mix altogether until crumbs are formed.

Pumpkin Muffins
Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees and spray some non-stick cooking spray on your muffin tin.
Ingredients:
1 3/4 cup flour (you can mix white with wheat and/or oat bran flour)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon cloves

Directions:
1 cup pumpkin (fresh or canned)
2/3 cup of brown sugar (I always put in less and I don’t pack the cup)
1/3 cup low fat sour cream (I use Greek plain yogurt)
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 egg beaten
3 tablespoons orange marmalade
2/3 cup chopped walnuts

Sift the first 8 ingredients into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the middle of the sifted mixture.
Add the next 6 ingredients into the well and stir together with a spoon until well mixed but not over mixed. Stir in the walnuts. Spoon the batter into the muffin tins and bake for about 20 minutes. Check with toothpick after 15 minutes.

Zucchini Muffins
Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees and spray some non-stick cooking spray on your muffin tin.
Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups flour (you can mix white with wheat and/or oat bran flour)
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup brown sugar (or less)
1/2 cup quick cooking oats

4 eggs, beaten
1 medium zucchini (10 ounces) shredded
3/4 cup Vegetable oil (or you can split the oil up with applesauce to reduce the fat)
1 cup nuts (pecans or walnuts)

Directions:
Sift the first 4 ingredients together into a large mixing bowl. Add the sugar and oats and mix with a fork to incorporate the sugar and oats into the flour mixture. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture. In a medium sized mixing bowl, add the eggs, zucchini and oil — mix together. Add the wet mixture to the well of the flour mixture. Stir with a spoon until well mixed, but not over mixed. Stir in the nuts. Spoon the batter into the muffin tins and bake for about 25 minutes. Start checking them after 20 minutes with a toothpick.

5 comments

1 Jaime McLeod { 02.06.14 at 8:32 am }

Bobby, just copy and paste the text of the recipe into a word processor document.

2 Bobby Helms { 02.05.14 at 11:28 am }

Enjoy very much, but how does a person go about printing a copy of the recipes, without making prints on all the pages?

3 sandra { 10.25.12 at 12:32 am }

I love muffins too.

4 Ali { 10.24.12 at 7:01 pm }

YUM! I have copy/pasted these recipes and will be baking them soon. My husband loves to take a muffin to work every day…I often have to triple the batch ha-ha!

5 robirock { 10.24.12 at 5:26 pm }

WOW! These recipes sound deeee-licious! I’ve printed them out and will be doing some BAKING this winter! Thanks very much for these recipes!
Robirock

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