Current Moon Phase

Waxing Crescent
1% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

It’s A Good Week To Explore Your Local Farmers Markets

It’s A Good Week To Explore Your Local Farmers Markets

Our country was founded on agriculture. Virtually everyone grew their own food for their families or sold it to merchants for resale. It is only fitting that August 3 – 9 is National Farmers Market Week.

At Farmers’ Almanac, we have long-championed growing your own food. We’ve offered advice on creating raised gardens in your yard, growing tomatoes on the balcony of a New York City apartment, or planting vegetables on top of a skyscraper in Chicago. There is something empowering about taking a seed and reaping the rewards a few weeks later.

In reality, many of us aren’t going to grow our own food or plant the full variety of produce that can be grown. That’s where community farmers markets come in. What started as a small effort is now 8,000+ strong throughout the United States. You can find farmers markets in major cities and small towns. In Lewiston, Maine, a farmers market sets up shop at our offices on Thursdays from 12 – 2 p.m. When you buy locally, you support local farm families, thus strengthening the community in which you live.

It is one thing to go through the produce section of your supermarket and quite another to visit a farmers market and see, feel, and smell the wide variety of items available. It brings out the child in us as we explore some greens that we never knew existed. Best of all, you can feed your family as well as we did centuries ago when we were all farmers.

So, this is National Farmers Market Week. Interested? Check out this link to find a market near you.

 

2 comments

1 Darshan Sonnylal { 08.18.14 at 11:16 am }

Your team and guide will surely help me out alot.

2 Darshan Sonnylal { 08.18.14 at 11:15 am }

I now live in one of the cool Caribbean Island called POS Trinidad, I also do farming in a big way of Paw Paw and Corn..just love seeing the plant grow up to harvesting time. I enjoy reaping and taking it to our local market.

Leave a Comment

Note: Comments that further the discussion of the above content are likely to be approved. Those comments that are vague or are simply submitted in order to promote a product, service or web site, although not necessarily considered "spam," are generally not approved.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.