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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Top Tips from Pete

Top Tips from Pete

Summer is officially here, which means it’s a great time to spend outdoors. Here are a few of my favorite tips for making the great outdoors more enjoyable.

Insects

Mosquitoes — put out a dish of water mixed with Joy dish soap, away from where you are sitting. It attracts the biters.

Goodbye fruit flies — fill a small glass with ½ inch of apple cider vinegar and 2 drops of dishwashing liquid and mix well. Fruit flies will be drawn to the cup and will meet their demise.

Insect bites — make a paste using meat tenderizer and water. Apply to sting or bite.  Or, toothpaste, regular flavored, when applied to an insect bite (especially fire ant bites) will relieve itching immediately.

Gnats — ever have gnats or other small insects swarming around while you eat on your deck? Take a powerful fan and aim high to say good bye.

Rashes and itches

Sunburn relief — Mix 2 tsp. tomato juice and ¼ cup buttermilk. Apply to affected area. Rinse.

Poison ivy — apply witch hazel to soothe the area. Or, add 8 oz. jar of instant tea to warm bath water and soak for 15 minutes.

Rashes — add ½ cup baking soda to a warm bath. Soak for at least 15 minutes.

Plants and Weeds

Weeds growing in your walkway — sprinkle baking soda on them.

Healthy flowers — after brewing coffee, toss the grinds on your flower bed.

Slug-fest — place a ring of petroleum jelly around plant containers which will stop the slugs and snails from climbing in for dinner.

Plant dill near tomato plants to prevent tomato worms. It works.

Better Living

Grass stains — rub in molasses, scrub well, let soak for a few minutes and wash.

Save on electricity. During the summer, hang a clothesline and let Mother Nature dry your clothes, especially towels which consume energy.

Fishermen (or women) — to make scaling fish easier, try rubbing vinegar on the scales first.
Summer is a great time to be outdoors — enjoy and stay safe!

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.