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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Earth Day Poem: The Note on the Tree

Earth Day  Poem: The Note on the Tree

In honor of Earth Day today, here’s a poem that according to legend, many Portuguese people would attach to trees in their forests:

Ye who passes by and would raise your hand against me, harken ‘ere you harm me.

I am the heat of your hearth on the cold winter nights, the friendly shade screening you from summer sun, and my fruits are refreshing, quenching your thirst as you journey on.

I am the beam that holds your house, the board of your table, the bed on which you lie, the timber that builds your boat.

I am the handle of your hoe, the door of your homestead, the wood of your cradle, and the shell of your coffin.

I am the bread of kindness and the flower of beauty. 

Ye who pass by, listen to my prayer, harm me not.

2 comments

1 marianne { 04.22.14 at 11:19 pm }

such a simple thought and so full of meaning.
we really only have one home forever.

2 hedy { 04.22.14 at 8:35 pm }

Wow! Like what it says. So true.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.