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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

McDoer

McDoer

There is an incredible industry devoted to following and reporting on (accurately or not) celebrities. We have become so infatuated by their every move that people with absolutely no talent become famous just by being absurd individuals. Then there are people who truly walk the walk and talk the talk. Ever since the Haitian earthquake, I have read about the good work Sean Penn has been doing on the ground. He has spent months living among Haitians and making his part of Port au Prince a better place.

Paul Newman was a superstar of stage and screen, yet he was not in the gossip columns. He managed to fund worthy causes in life and created a line of products that continues his work after death.

Closer to home, Patrick Dempsey is a Lewiston, Maine, native. He was born and raised here and has gone on to great fame as Dr. Shepherd on Grey’s Anatomy. He is both a television and movie star, having starred in such films as Made of Honor, Enchanted, Sweet Home Alabama, and many more. His mother was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 1997 and has had multiple relapses over the last 16 years. In her honor, Patrick helped to establish the Patrick Dempsey Center at Central Maine Medical Center here in Lewiston, where the Farmers’ Almanac is headquartered. This is a relatively small community, but with Patrick not only lending his star power but also spending time in the community during the weekend, $1,200,000 was raised last weekend to help those inflicted with cancer and to research a cure.

Patrick is hometown boy who has found success outside of Maine, but his true gift is that of actively participating in a cause that has touched many. I have never met him, but I admire his work. Here is more on his work: Patrick Dempsey Center.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.