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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

5 Fun Facts about the Farmers’ Almanac

 

1.    80-85% accurate is what followers claim the Almanac’s forecasts are.

2.    197 years old — the Farmers’ Almanac’s been printed every year since 1818.

3.    “Caleb Weatherbee” real person, not real name, is the only person who knows the exact weather predicting formula the Almanac uses.

4.    Farmers’ Almanac editors are “Philoms” a title Ben Franklin used when he edited his almanac. It’s an abbreviation for the Greek world “Philomath” meaning “Lover of learning.”

5.    Farmers’ Almanac has steered clear of politics since the early 1800s when the Almanac said Congress spent too much money and talked too much, and it has not found it necessary to make an utterance since.

3 comments

1 Sandi Duncan { 10.15.13 at 2:06 pm }

Thanks Karen – and I hope you have a very happy birthday!!

2 Karen { 10.15.13 at 2:04 pm }

I love The Farmer’s Almanac and have followed it most my life. No where else do you get more accurate weather. Thank you for these five fun facts! By the way, today is my 67th. birthday and so happy to be hear and read your site as always.:)

3 Karen { 10.15.13 at 2:04 pm }

I love The Farmer’s Almanac and have followed it most my life. No where else do you get more accurate weather. Thank you for these five fun facts! By the way, today is my 67th. birthday and so happy to be hear and read your site as always.:)

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.