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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Time to Spring Ahead!

Time to Spring Ahead!

Don’t forget to turn your clocks forward – or “Spring Ahead” – this weekend! Daylight Saving Time starts at 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 10, 2013.

If that feels a little early to you, it’s because we used to move from Standard Time to Daylight Saving Time in early April, not early March. Since 2007, when the Energy Act of 2005 took effect, we have changed the clocks in November and March rather than October and April, as most of us were once accustomed to doing. That means more than two thirds of each year (245 days) is now in DST.

In the 2007 Farmers’ Almanac, we shared our own thoughts on the change.

Did you know that Ben Franklin himself is credited with the idea of changing the clocks? Read Franklin’s original letter in which he explained why we should make the sun rise later.

What do you think about Daylight Saving Time? Do you like the new dates, the old dates, or would you prefer no clock changing at all?

1 comment

1 Brenda { 03.08.13 at 3:24 pm }

I like springing ahead but one thing I CANT STAND: We lose an hour of sleep, so that means when I leave in the mornings at 7 AM in the new time, im actually leaving at 6:00. Ive gotten used to it being daylight at 6:30-7:00 but now it will be dark. I get up so much better when its daylight outside. In the summer when I wake up at 6, the sun is already shining through my window so I wake up better but im sure you all at the Farmers Almanac know all about getting up early LOL! I like the extra daylight in the evenings but im not a morning person. Mornings are gonna take some work!

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