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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

The Blizzard of ’13: Your Photos

The Blizzard of 2013, dubbed “Nemo” by the Weather Channel, has come and gone. Over the course of two days, a powerful nor’easter, created by the collision of two storm fronts, dumped record amounts of snow on the Northeastern U.S., with several feet falling on parts of southern New England. The winner (or loser, depending on how you look at it) for the most snow was Hamden, Connecticut, with an unbelievable a 40 inches. Compounding the snowfall was the punishing wind, which reached a peak of 89 miles per hour in coastal Maine.

We asked readers to share their weather reports with us on Twitter and Facebook. Here’s a look at what you had to say:

Gina M Duprey: 2ft of snow in the Berkshires

Jon M. Kinney: Just a regular snowstorm in Maine

Nicole Ginthwain: About 2 1/2 feet on the North Shore MA. The wind was wicked but thankfully we kept power. Also there have been a lot of reports of Carbon monoxide incidents and deaths due to the storm. So if you got buried, please check your outside vents to make sure they are clear of snow and while cleaning off your car, clear the exhaust pipes. There were a couple deaths regarding the cars.

Here’s a shot of a cresting wave of snow in my own front yard here in Lewiston, Maine:

And here’s a shot from Michelle St. Pierre Preston in not-too-distant Windham Maine:

A bit farther south, in Weymouth, Massachusetts, Karen Corbett-Litwinczuk got this shot of cars buried in the snow:

Here are a couple of shots of furry friends romping in the snow, submitted by Heather Bernier from North Providence, Rhode Island, and Becky Lee, who didn’t say where she was from:

Tonya Ball Garofalo sent us this shot of her 21″ in northern New Jersey:

And Katrina Lackner Slade, from Millbrook, New York, sent this shot of the Hudson River iced over:

What did you see in your area? There’s still time to share photos on our Facebook page!

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