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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

These Are Scary Times!

These Are Scary Times!

No doubt these are scary times. If all of the political wrangling doesn’t jar you, then fear of a east coast weather system dubbed “Frankenstorm” could keep you indoors for the rest of the fall.

When I was little, I vividly remember a TV movie that must have rerun several times. During every viewing, I would hide under a table while the rest of the family watched. It is hard to imagine that I was the biggest coward in the family (at the time). When I went into the dark basement, I used whistle, as if that would scare off ghosts or, worse yet, robbers.

When you think about childhood, you realize that we are all born with a degree of fear, whether it be monsters in the closet or the spooky house down the street. We outgrow most of these childhood fears, but I think there is always something that we fear. As we enter Halloween week, I want to know what you fear most. Any ghosts or demons in your house? If so, is it because you have teenagers and they feed off of their energy? That was true for a friend in Akron, Ohio. What is it you fear? Thankfully, I know that if I ever see that old movie, I still have a table to climb under to keep me safe!

1 comment

1 dwilsontx { 10.30.12 at 7:26 am }

I just looked at the long range forecast from Almanac for this week for the east coast and its says: Clear and mild, good for trick or treaters. Now, if we had paid attention to the Farmers’ Almanac, our kids would have been wading through 14′ of water to go trick or treating. Why should I believe anything in the Farmers’ Almanac if it got something as monumental as Sandy wrong?

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.