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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

The Secret is Out! Weather Formula is Moved to Safer Spot

The Secret is Out!  Weather Formula is Moved to Safer Spot

For 196 years, the lure of a publication that boasts long-range weather outlooks that defy local forecasters accuracy rates has been growing. How does the Farmers’ Almanac predict weather for next winter, spring, and summer?

“It’s a method based on a very old set of rules established back in 1818,” says Peter Geiger, Philom, Editor of the Farmers’ Almanac, “our predictions are based on a very specific and reliable formula that remains secret to all but a few select Almanac associates.”

For years, many investigative reporters have tried to uncover this formula, and just who “Caleb Weatherbee” really is.

“He goes by the name of Caleb Weatherbee, a pseudonym for a real person who knows a lot about the weather,” Geiger shares.

While the Farmers’ Almanac has been published every year since 1818, there have only been seven weather prognosticators who have held this esteemed position.

“It’s more than a job, it’s a passion for all things weather,” says Geiger, “and we’d prefer to keep his identity a close brand secret just as we do the formula itself.”

Recently, the Associated Press was granted an exclusive phone interview with Weatherbee, which caused quite a stir at the Almanac’s headquarters in Lewiston, Maine.

“We wanted our fans and readers to know that Caleb is a real person, with a wealth of weather and Farmers’ Almanac knowledge and know-how,” reports Sandi Duncan, Philom, Managing Editor.

Since then, rumors have been spreading that the formula is in possible danger for being stolen.

“Let’s face it,” reflects Duncan, “Mother Nature has been quite extreme this past summer, and Old Man Winter was on a hiatus. Everyone wants to know what’s in store next.”

As such, the editors decided it was time to move the original formula.

While some think the formula should be brought into the digital age, Geiger points out that there are so many treasured handwritten notes, mathematical observations, and information contained within the original documentation that the charm and history of the Almanac would be lost if they converted it. In addition, he worries that a computer system could be hacked into.

So, Almanac Publishing Company has moved the formula from one undisclosed location to another, to protect the secret weather formula that has accurately predicted weather for nearly 200 years. Perhaps when the Farmers’ Almanac celebrates its 200th anniversary in 2018, the editors will reveal a bit more about this famous formula? Time will tell …

8 comments

1 mike { 09.12.12 at 12:23 pm }

IN 1978 I KEPT UP DAILY WITH THE ALMANAC AS I DO NOW. ON JAN.1 1979 I LOOKED BACK AT 1977 AND THE ALMANAC WAS 98.9% CORRECT. YES EVEN A GOOD BATTER HAS A BAD DAY, BUT I WILL ALWAYS PLACE MY BET ON THE ALMANAC AND NATURE

2 Felicia { 08.30.12 at 1:36 pm }

Don’t share – love something is still kept close without digital interference – lots of fog for us these last 2 weeks of AUgust!

3 Arthur Yearwood { 08.29.12 at 5:08 pm }

Put the weather formula in a vault like Coke in Atlanta.

4 seasoul70 { 08.29.12 at 3:17 pm }

Where are my manners? THANK YOU!!!

5 seasoul70 { 08.29.12 at 3:16 pm }

I have been a weather geek since Snowjam, here in Atlanta back in 1983 (?) when I got stuck on top of a local “mountain” at work. Keep that info safe, please. I depend on you for long range and TWC for daily reports.

6 Les Roberson { 08.29.12 at 12:20 pm }

Releasing the formula would be like asking Jeb Bush for original pork & beans receipe. or the JCS releasing troops movements. It just is not going to happen. Furthermore who would need the FA any more. Its the bigest reason to read it.

Les

7 Diana from CNY { 08.29.12 at 11:34 am }

The wooly-bears are very dark this year, jus’ sayin’. Keep up the good work.

8 Diane Bush { 08.29.12 at 10:41 am }

This is very enlightening! Always wondered how a person could live that long and still be on top of their game. I depend on your information so much and have recommended to friends, neighbors, total strangers and family. Thanks for all you do.

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.