Current Moon Phase

Waxing Crescent
48% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Go Ahead, We Dare You!

Spring has sprung, warm temperatures have been experienced in many areas, and for some it’s gardening season, while for others we have a few more weeks to go. What if we dare you to grow at least one plant that you can eat this season?

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that there has been so much in the news about food and how it’s grown, harvested, fertilized with chemicals, and more. What better time to try and grow something on your own? If you have kids or grandchildren, it’s a great way to get them involved in an activity that is rewarding, fun and a great learning experience.

Whether you have a big yard or just a balcony or even inside (lettuce is a good pick for an inside crop), you can grow one or a few vegetables this season.

We have tons of tips on how to plant a garden, where to plant and when on our site, (simply search vegetable garden), as well as in the print edition of the Farmers’ Almanac. We even have a best days to plant guide that many who follow say they get great results.

Nothing tastes better than a fresh picked tomato off a plant you’ve nurtured. Give it a try and let us know what you grew and how it worked.

To help get you started here are a few links to some useful gardening stories (but be sure to search vegetable gardens on our site for even more useful stories):

Top 5 Easiest Vegetables to Grow

Grow Your Own Food in Containers

Top Ten Gardening Hints

Go ahead, we dare you! Try to grow something on your own this year. Start small and we bet you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.