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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

In Like A Lion or Lamb?

In Like A Lion or Lamb?

Today is March 1. Is the weather at your house more like a lion or a lamb? This winter, especially on the East Coast, lamb-like weather has been the winner. Now that we are only 19 days away from spring, I’m secretly hoping that if this winter has any more snow or lion-like weather events up its sleeve that it comes out before the middle of the month.

Here at Farmers’ Almanac’s headquarters in Lewiston, Maine, March is coming in like a lion. Both the Farmers’ Almanac and the local weather forecasters are calling for snow. Soon we will release our official spring outlook for the whole country, but until then, we may be doing some additional shoveling at our office.

Weather folklore is very colorful and sometimes very accurate. Do you recall what any of the natural forecasters or folklore in your area were forewarning of for the winter ahead? Were there a lot of acorns? Did the wooly worm caterpillar have more orange than brown or vice versa? Do you recall?

Here’s some information and background on the reasoning behind the lore,  “In like a lion, out like a lamb”, which then begs the question, if a season comes in mild and leaves mild, will the next season make up for it?

I guess time will tell.

6 comments

1 Randy { 03.20.12 at 7:53 pm }

Does anyone know of a saying about raking in March?

2 Lynne { 03.01.12 at 1:18 pm }

lion here in mass, snowy cold and icy!!!

3 rebecca { 03.01.12 at 12:27 pm }

Its a Beautiful Day for March1st!! It will be a Lamb for Tennessee!!

4 Uncle Mater { 03.01.12 at 10:51 am }

Here in Denver, PM snow showers with 1-3 inch accumulation through tomorrow morning. Sounds like a lion to me.

5 Jan Nordan { 03.01.12 at 10:39 am }

North Carolina – 80 degrees and sunny. Like a lamb.

6 LeeAnne Willis { 03.01.12 at 9:52 am }

I live in Arkansas. The weather here today is sunny and 75 degrees.

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