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Happy New Year! It’s 4,710!

Happy New Year! It’s 4,710!

No, we’re not beginning a new science fiction series on our website, and you didn’t fall asleep for 2,700 years. January 23, 2012, is Chinese New Year, which means today marks the first day of the 4,710th year of the Chinese calendar.

Chinese New Year is the most important celebration in traditional Chinese culture. It begins during the new Moon of the lunar month of ZhÄ“ngyuè, which generally falls a month or so after the western New Year. The celebration itself can last for weeks, and incorporates many traditions, including fireworks, special foods, dragon and/or lion dances, gifts, rituals such as sweeping out one’s home, and more.

Each new year is named for one of the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac, and children born during those years are said to possess some of the qualities of that year’s totem. This year will be the Year of the Dragon, a legendary creature associated with high energy, optimism, and prosperity. Dragon years are considered auspicious.

Here’s hoping that proves to be true this year. Happy New Year!

2 comments

1 Andrea { 01.27.12 at 9:14 pm }

Southeast Michigan has seen very very unusual weather. To date maybe 4 inch’s of snow but not lasting for more than 2 days. We have had more rain than snow and way above normal temps day and night. We usually hit frigid temps in January and we have not come close other than 2 days. Today, I was out digging in my veggie gardens as we grow large gardens for produce can and freeze and I could dig 6 inch down, no frost. My chickens who also tend to hang out inside in Dec, Jan, and February have also been outside by choice. If you were a snow plow guy, operated a ski resort (we have two by us) you would of been rained out even if you could of made snow which was also questionable, or the guy that snowed a snow blower, snow shovel (have not even had to use that either because temps remaining above freezing for most part) it was not a good year for you………….Yes, Southeast Michigan has never seen anything like this. I was born and raised here and have spent my entire life here and totally bizarre but loving it. Oh yah, we have all the salt we need for next you because we used so little of it so far this year.

2 carroll { 01.23.12 at 1:53 pm }

This is good…my grandsons Christmas program 2011, had a dragon in it! They sang a Chinese song. Fabulous!

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