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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Where’s the Snow?

Ok I must admit. I’m missing snow this winter. But then again, I’m happy that our predictions in the Farmers’ Almanac have been so accurate, especially here in the Mid-Atlantic Sates.

Each year as we work on finalizing the details and long-range outlook for the winter ahead, I feel privileged to know ahead of time what the weather is going to be like. Last spring when I read Caleb’s outlook for above normal temperatures and more wet than white, I got a little bummed. I’m all for a slightly warmer winter (better for the oil bill), but a lack of the white (snow) stuff is a little disappointing. The only thing worse for me is when we summarize the summer as damp and cool. (Fortunately we did not for this summer ahead!)

Here in New Jersey, we haven’t seen any measurable snow since October 31 (which was odd in and of itself). In Lewiston, Maine, the Farmers’ Almanac’s headquarters, they had snow for all of the major holidays — Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas, but it didn’t last long on the ground, thanks to the slightly warmer temperatures predicted in the Almanac. In Maine, the Almanac did call for snowy conditions, and to date Lewiston, has had more snow this winter than average. Yet I bet everyone on the East Coast would agree — it’s a weird winter.

But I must be patient. February is coming quickly and the Farmers’ Almanac does finally mention some snow for the Northeast. So maybe my dreams of white will come true then.

How has the winter been in your backyard? Wild, wet, weird? We must remember that winter is still young — not even a month old yet, so there is plenty of time for the wet stuff to turn white and cover driveways and roadways making them tricky to drive on. I just am looking forward to making my first snowman of 2012.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.