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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Why April Fools is Special To Us

Today is the last day of March. Speaking weather-wise, March seems to be going out like a lion in many areas with rain, snow, and a mixture of everything in between on the radar screen for the whole  East Coast. Fortunately, for the West Coast, they seem to be more on a lamb’s ending which is good, since they’ve had their fair if not more than fair share of storms this month.

The first day of April, also known as April Fools’ Day, has a special place in the heart and history of the Farmers’ Almanac. Ray Geiger, Philom., and our longest running Almanac history (60+ years), passed away on April Fools’ Day back in 1994. While we know logically that no one can “choose” the day he or she leaves this world, it seemed very appropriate for Mr. Geiger, also known as “King of Cornography” (he loved corny jokes), to have died on a day known for pranks and fun.

I was in charge of running a photo down to the local newspaper on the day he passed away. When I arrived at the paper’s office, they asked me if it was true. For a minute, I didn’t know what they were talking about, but then I realized that they were asking me if Ray really did pass away or if was an April Fools’ Prank.

Fast-forward to April 1, 1999, and I found myself on the way to the hospital to deliver my second child. It seemed obvious to me that by having a baby on April Fools’ Day, I was destined to work at the Farmers’ Almanac for the rest of my life . . .

And now, for many, Old Man Winter seems to be pulling a great prank on us by sending a major “winter-like” snowstorm to the northern sections of the northeast tomorrow. The plus is that it’s spring and hopefully the snow won’t last long.

What are your associations with April 1st? And do tell us — did March come in like a lamb and out like a lion in your area or vice versa? Share here.

1 comment

1 TheMaineMan { 04.03.11 at 12:52 am }

In like a lion and out like a lamb describes April, not March, in the state of Maine.

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