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NASA Video Captures “Sun Monster”

Description from NASA:

When a rather large-sized flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period…

These images were captured on February 24th, 2011. Full Description »

8 comments

1 Jaime McLeod { 08.02.12 at 10:39 am }

Gravity, Steve. The Sun has an incredible gravitational pull. It’s what keeps us, and the rest of the Solar System, countless hundreds of millions of miles away, in orbit.

2 Steve { 08.01.12 at 9:55 am }

Why does the vapor go back to the “opening”? I would think if the sun was erupting; it would fling material out away from the opening. I can see the white hot “lava” being blown out to space; but I also can see the “vapor” rebounding back towards the opening. Almost looks like a vacuum (sp?) is created.

Steve

3 Jaime McLeod { 06.04.12 at 10:01 am }

Yes, Christie, Solar flares cause auroras.

4 christie { 06.02.12 at 4:02 am }

is this what aurora borealis reflected on earth?,..magnificent video NASA, thanks

5 Dale { 03.25.12 at 1:50 pm }

Thank heavens that one was on the edge of the sundisk in relation to Earth and not in the center heading toward us!

6 r lawson { 03.01.12 at 12:55 pm }

we are insignificant, aren’t we?

7 Cheri Reeves { 03.26.11 at 5:55 pm }

How much of what the sun spit out into space hit us? Does anyone know of and effect it may have caused here on earth?

8 ANNE BALL { 03.16.11 at 9:19 pm }

totally awesome what our NASA images find. WOW!

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