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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

The Lure of Snow

Snow. Many people love it. Many hate it. Yet there’s something magical about that white sugar that frosts landscapes. It’s almost as thought the landscape gets a fresh coat of white paint.

If you turn the news on when a storm is happening, they of course flood your home with reports of accidents, traffic, and travel delays, yet they always show a clip of kids and parents alike playing in the snow. It’s almost as though snow invites us to be a kid again, even if it’s just for an hour or so.

If you live in an area that gets snow, do you head outdoors to do something fun when the white stuff falls to the ground? Or do you hide inside until it’s over?

What’s your favorite thing to do in the snow?

There are lots of outdoor winter activities… everything from ice fishing, to skiing, to snowman building. Sometimes just a walk outdoors in the cold, fresh air is enough to remind you why snow and winter is a refreshing season. And if you don’t live where it snows, do you ever visit places just for to see snow? To throw a snowball …

Share your favorite outdoor winter activities here. Do you ski?  Ice fish?

2 comments

1 Joy { 01.05.11 at 1:45 pm }

p.S. I live in Virginia

2 Joy { 01.05.11 at 1:43 pm }

I am employed in a school system, and planned a workshop for Jan. 13, 2011.
Any snow/ice predicted? Please reply.
thank you!

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.