Current Moon Phase

Waxing Crescent
1% of full

Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Keep JOY in the Season

Well it’s that time of the year, the holidays. While the holidays should be a very joyful time of the year, we all know they can be very stressful. Rushing here and there, finding the best gifts, preparing the house, and then coming up with New Year’s resolutions…I get tired just thinking of it all.

In the 2005, the Farmers’ Almanac recognized the hectic pace and suggested that we should pause for a moment and put the “Joy Back into Christmas.” Here are a few suggestions on ways to keep “joy” in the season:

  • Joy of Appreciation – we all have friends who are special. If they don’t know it, take a moment to hand write a card expressing the importance they play in your life. This gesture is more than priceless.
  • Joy of Fun — do something simple but fun. Drive around and check out all the lights in the neighborhood, play in the snow, sing Christmas songs.
  • Joy of Doing — some people just don’t need anything. But, how about shoveling a walkway or cutting a lawn or giving the gift of your time and talent. Many elderly can’t get out during winter months, but you can be a ticket to some independence. It is about your time. Whether you are there to listen or to help someone, your time is all that matters.
  • Joy of Laughter — hugs and laughter are good for your heart and soul. Make someone laugh.
  • Joy of Prayer and Believing — December is a month filled with many religious holidays. Take someone to go to church, a synagogue or temple to worship.

And finally, Albert Schweitzer has a quote that speaks to the season:
“At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.”

What do you do with and for others that money can’t buy? Share your thoughts and ideas, and happy stress-free holidays.


0 comments

There are no comments yet...

Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment

Note: Comments that further the discussion of the above content are likely to be approved. Those comments that are vague or are simply submitted in order to promote a product, service or web site, although not necessarily considered "spam," are generally not approved.

If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.