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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Today is the Day!

Today is the day we at the Farmers’ Almanac have spent all year anticipating: the official release of the 2011 Farmers’ Almanac.

It’s a busy day for me, as well as for Managing Editor Sandi Duncan, as we navigate numerous interview requests, beginning early in the morning and continuing until late into the evening. It’s all worth it for us, though, if it means more people get a chance to read our 194th edition.

Be sure to head out to your local store and pick up a copy of our Almanac (the one with the orange and green cover!), or pick one up right here on our website. In fact, pick up a few; buy one for every member of your family. The holidays are closer than you realize, and they make great stocking stuffers.

So, what’s in this year’s edition, you ask? Over the coming weeks and months, we’ll highlight several stories from our print edition right here on our web site, starting this week, with our 2011 weather outlook. You’ll also find a walk down memory lane as we remember the many household gadgets of yesteryear that were once seen as indispensable. As always, this year’s edition includes valuable tips and hints for smarter, simpler, more resourceful living, including ways to boost your immune system.

This year, we’re also celebrating the power of friendship by declaring 2011 the Year of Friendship. Read our story about one devoted group of friends, and be sure to tell us all about your Friends for Life.

Next week, we’ll reveal which cities we named as America’s Ten WORST Winter & Summer Weather Cities. Did your hometown make the list? Watch this space to find out!

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If you notice a hole in the upper left-hand corner of your Farmers' Almanac, don't return it to the store! That hole isn't a defect; it's a part of history. Starting with the first edition of the Farmers' Almanac in 1818, readers used to nail holes into the corners to hang it up in their homes, barns, and outhouses (to provide both reading material and toilet paper). In 1910, the Almanac's publishers began pre-drilling holes in the corners to make it even easier for readers to keep all of that invaluable information (and paper) handy.