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Farmers Almanac
The 2014 Farmers Almanac
Farmers' Almanac

Building Hope in Haiti

On April 22nd, I will be heading to Port au Prince, Haiti. A wonderful friend, Chris Pomerleau, and his Church-mates have been helping an orphanage build a school serving 500 children during the last 5 years. Each April, they make a trip and continue the construction. The project was near completion with only part of the roof left to complete. They also bring much needed supplies like pencils, paper, tents, air mattresses, etc. The mid-January earthquake damaged the top 2 floors. The mission now is to complete the removal of debris and start putting walls up for the 2nd and maybe 3rd floors. A roof is for another year. I am known for having no mechanical talent, but am willing to do as much as I can, including carry cement and cinder blocks with the best of them.

Our local newspaper, The Sun Journal, ran a story about the trip. When asked, why I was going, I said that the media brings these stories into our homes. As with most of us, I wanted to do something to ease the burden on those in Haiti who started with nothing and now have less. The easy part is to write a check. The challenge will be to go and help reconstruct a school. So, 20 of us head to Haiti next Friday through May 1st. By the grace of God, we will build the school and bring some hope to the lives we touch. It will also be one of life’s great lessons for me.

Next week I will share photos and again once I return.

1 comment

1 Molly Joss { 04.18.10 at 10:28 pm }

Peter, this is great news. I have posted about your trip on my Web site/blog, Building Hope for Haiti (http://www.buildinghopeforhaiti.org). This kind of involvement and selfless caring is exactly what Haiti needs. I look forward to reading your posts about the trip.

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